Elmina


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Elmina

(ĕlmē`nə), town, S Ghana, on the Gulf of Guinea; also known locally as Edina. It is a fishing center located in a region where corn and cassava are grown. In the late 1400s the Portuguese established an outpost near the native settlement of Anomansa, and later (1482) built St. Jorge's castle, which still stands. It was the first important European settlement on the Gold Coast. The Portuguese colony was conquered by the Dutch in 1637; it passed to Great Britain in 1872.
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References in classic literature ?
I came down from Elmina to deal with you," Da Souza continued.
When Camile Ade-John spoke movingly of her experience in Elmina Castle, one of Ghana's slave fortresses, tears trickled from the eyes of her listeners.
Israeli Culture Minister Miri Regev threatened to cut funding to the Jaffa based Elmina Theater group because their manager refused to perform in an illegal settlement in the West Bank.
Capitein (aka Rafael Septien) was an advocate of enslaving ADPs as he argued in his 1742 dissertation that it was consistent with Christianity as he subsequently served the European enslavement of Africans as Chaplain to Elmina Castle, a famous slave dungeon (Thompson, 1987).
While Homegoing was being auctioned in London, in Elmina on Ghana's coast, the next generation of African writers was being encouraged to tell their own stories.
For Gonzalez, Ximena's marching song is pure, cool water, embodying the domestic and patriotic ideal; but Elmina sees it as a bitter cup of death.
ROBERTS -KATHLEEN MARY, May 15th 2014 peacefully at Ysbyty Gwynedd, Bangor of Elmina, Castellor Estate, Cemaes Bay aged 85.
and Elmina (Sargent) Mullen, and lived in Bedford, NH, for many years before moving to Hampton 14 years ago.
In 12 years [between 1637 and 1648), they transported no less than 23,163 slaves from Elmina and Loanda, for an amount of 6,714,423 guilders and 60 cents [the Dutch were very precise
Portuguese mariners reached the region of West Africa known today as Ghana in 1471 and in 1485 built a trading post, known as Elmina, where they traded with the natives for gold, ivory, pepper and slaves.
Proceedings of an international workshop on lethal yellowing-like disease of coconut, Elmina, Ghana, November1995.