Eloquence


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Eloquence

Ambrose, St.
bees, prophetic of fluency, landed in his mouth. [Christian Hagiog: Brewster, 177]
Antony, Mark
gives famous speech against Caesar’s assassins. [Br. Lit.: Julius Caesar]
Arnall, Father
his sermons fill Stephen with the fear of hell-fire. [Br. Lit.: Joyce Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man]
bees on the mouth
pictorial and verbal symbol of eloquence. [Folklore and Christian Iconog.: Brewster, 177]
Bragi
god of poetry and fluent oration. [Norse Myth.: LLEI, I: 324]
Calliope
chief muse of poetic inspiration and oratory. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 177]
Churchill, Winston
(1874–1965) statesman whose rousing oratory led the British in WWII. [Br. Hist.: NCE, 556]
Cicero
(106–43 B. C.) orator whose forcefulness of presentation and melodious language is still imitated. [Rom. Hist.: NCE, 558]
Demosthenes
(382–322 B.C.) generally considered the greatest of the Greek orators. [Gk. Hist.: NCE, 559]
Gettysburg Address
Lincoln’s brief, moving eulogy for war dead (1863). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 286–287]
King, Martin Luther, Jr
. (1929–1968) civil rights leader and clergyman whose pleas for justice won support of millions. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1134]
lotus
symbol of eloquence. [Plant Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
Mapple, Father
preaches movingly and ominously on Jonah. [Am. Lit.: Melville Moby Dick]
Paine, Thomas
(1737–1809) powerful voice of the colonies; wrote famous “Common Sense.” [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 369–370]
Webster, Daniel
(1782–1852) noted 19th-century American orator-politician. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 539]
References in classic literature ?
This Narrative contains many affecting incidents, many passages of great eloquence and power; but I think the most thrilling one of them all is the de- scription DOUGLASS gives of his feelings, as he stood soliloquizing respecting his fate, and the chances of his one day being a freeman, on the banks of the Chesapeake Bay--viewing the receding vessels as they flew with their white wings before the breeze, and apostrophizing them as animated by the living spirit of freedom.
This lad, for he was scarcely a man, -- simple, natural, eloquent with that eloquence of the heart never found when sought for; full of affection for everybody, because he was happy, and because happiness renders even the wicked good -- extended his affection even to his judge, spite of Villefort's severe look and stern accent.
Pitt, afterward Earl of Chatham, who spent so much of his wondrous eloquence in endeavoring to warn England of the consequences of her injustice.
Such in its strictly official eloquence is the form of funeral orations on ships that, perhaps wearied with a long struggle, or in some unguarded moment that may come to the readiest of us, had let themselves be overwhelmed by a sudden blow from the enemy.
The goat's hoofs were tied, and the king's procurator resumed the thread of his eloquence.
It was regarded as a model of ecclesiastical, patriotic eloquence.
With a woman's tact and eloquence, she told the whole story.
Excepting the ease of feeble stomachs, who cares for eloquence in the presence of a supper-table?
Thence to the famous Orators repair, Those ancient whose resistless eloquence Wielded at will that fierce democraty, Shook the Arsenal, and fulmined over Greece To Macedon and Artaxerxes' throne.
What is called eloquence in the forum is commonly found to be rhetoric in the study.
No eloquence could have been so withering to one's belief in mankind as his final burst of sincerity.
Amongst other things they spoke of the middle ages: some praised that period as far more interesting, far more poetical than our own too sober present; indeed Councillor Knap defended this opinion so warmly, that the hostess declared immediately on his side, and both exerted themselves with unwearied eloquence.