embryonic stem cell

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embryonic stem cell

[‚em·brē¦än·ik ′stem ‚sel]
(embryology)
Undifferentiated cell derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst that can give rise to any of the three embryonic germ layers, and thus can form any cell or tissue type of the body, but cannot give rise to the full spectrum of cells required to complete fetal development.
References in periodicals archive ?
Federal funding of embryonic stem cell research is a tragic waste of lives as well as taxpayer money, since despite the promises made to gain the federal funding, there is not a single example of a successful treatment.
US District Judge Royce Lamberth granted the injunction because he found that the doctors who challenged the policy would likely succeed because US law blocked federal funding of embryonic stem cell research if the embryos were destroyed.
Bush cleared the way for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research in 2001, but restricted scientists to 21 lines of cells that had already been created.
Researchers affiliated to several Christian groups filed the case, saying that human embryonic stem cell research involves the destruction of human embryos, and that the new NIH guidelines for human stem cell research were 'contrary to law'.
We believe the NIH's human embryonic stem cell research policies are sound, ethical, and responsible," said Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD, Nobel laureate and president of the AACR.
Opponents of embryonic stem cell research say any medical advances are not worth what they see as the destruction of human life.
Bush imposed restrictions on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research.
Pro-lifers worked diligently in opposition to the initiative and to bring the truth to the publicthat embryonic stem cell research has not led to any treatments, that there are successful alternatives being used now, and that ambiguities in the amendment's wording actually remove all restric-tions to embryonic stem cell research and could lead to human cloning.
Instead of acknowledging the wisdom of pursuing all productive channels of research, the White House adopted a smug "I told you so" justification for Bush's six-year ban on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research.
Embryonic stem cell research raises more ethical issues because scientists have to create an embryo and then destroy it, after a few days, to harvest stem cells, whereas umbilical cord blood is collected at birth from tissue that would otherwise be discarded.
On the other hand George Bush and the USA have banned federal funding for such research and have supported ethical stem cell research using non human embryonic tissue, which is making embryonic stem cell research increasingly redundant.
The debates on both adult and embryonic stem cell research were dominated by the opposition parties, primarily the Canadian Alliance, which later merged with the Progressive Conservatives to become the Conservative Party, without any significant response from the governing party.