emerald

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emerald,

the green variety of berylberyl
, mineral, a silicate of beryllium and aluminum, Be3Al2Si6O18, extremely hard, occurring in hexagonal crystals that may be of enormous size and are usually white, yellow, green, blue, or colorless.
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, of which aquamarine is the blue variety. Chemically, it is a beryllium-aluminum silicate whose color is due to small quantities of chromium compounds. The emerald was highly esteemed in antiquity; the stones were used for ornaments in early Egypt where some of the first emeralds were mined. The some of the finest emeralds are found in South America in Colombia, where they have been mined for over 400 years. The gem was a favorite in pre-Columbian Mexico and Peru, where it was cut in intricate designs. The treasure taken back to Spain by early explorers included emeralds. Good emeralds are rare and the most highly valued of gem stones. Zambia and Brazil are also significant sources of the natural stones. Synthetic emeralds are also manufactured in Germany, France, and the United States. The Oriental emerald, a different gem, is the transparent green variety of corundumcorundum
, mineral, aluminum oxide, Al2O3. The clear varieties are used as gems and the opaque as abrasive materials. Corundum occurs in crystals of the hexagonal system and in masses. It is transparent to opaque and has a vitreous to adamantine luster.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Emerald

 

a mineral that is a transparent variety of beryl tinged with an admixture of Crj03 to a deep grass-green color. Emeralds are found in crystals and their concretions, usually intergrown in micaceous rock, quartz, or feldspar. The crystals, measuring 2–5 cm by 0.5–2 cm, rarely larger, are fractured. The larger deposits are connected with zones of the contact alteration of amphibolites, magnesial schist, and serpentinites by granitic pegmatites. Emeralds are also found in quartz feldspar veins and in altered schistose-carbonate rocks. Deposits are rare and are mainly in the USSR (Urals), Republic of South Africa (Transvaal), and Colombia (Muzo). Emeralds are highly valued as gems; those that are large (more than 5 carats), flawless, and have a deep, rich color are considered to be more valuable than diamonds.

Synthetic emeralds (so-called igmeralds) are made, but their crystals are often fissured and no larger than 0.5 by 3 cm.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

emerald

[′em·rəld]
(mineralogy)
Al2(Be3Si6O18) A brilliant-green to grass-green gem variety of beryl that crystallizes in the hexagonal system; green color is caused by varying amounts of chromium. Also known as smaragd.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

emerald

May. [Am. Gem Symbolism: Kunz, 319–320]

emerald

relieves diseases of the eye. [Gem Symbolism: Kunz, 370]
See: Healing
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

emerald

1. a green transparent variety of beryl: highly valued as a gem
2. 
a. the clear green colour of an emerald
b. (as adjective): an emerald carpet
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Emerald

An object-oriented distributed programming language and environment developed at the University of Washington in the early 1980s. Emeral was the successor to EPL. It is strongly typed and uses signatures and prototypes rather than inheritance.

["Distribution and Abstract Types in Emerald", A. Black et al, IEEE Trans Soft Eng SE-13(1):65-76 (Jan 1987)].
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in classic literature ?
"My dear child--what are you, a rummage sale or a guess-me-quick?--in me you behold the Body- Guard of our gracious Ruler, Princess Ozma, as well as the Royal Army of Oz and the Police Force of the Emerald City."
An hour ago I was called to the presence of her Highness, Ozma of Oz, and told to arrest a boy named Ojo the Unlucky, who was journeying from the Munchkin Country to the Emerald City and would arrive in a short time.
Dorothy helped him over the fence, and they started along the path of yellow brick for the Emerald City.
I ordered the Emerald City to be built just where the four countries cornered together, and when it was completed I announced myself the Ruler of the Land of Oz, which included all the four countries of the Munchkins, the Gillikins, the Winkies and the Quadlings.
"We owe a great deal to the Wonderful Wizard," continued the Princess, "for it was you who built this splendid Emerald City."
"How long did you rule the Emerald City, after I left here?" was the next question.
He was a bad man and a powerful monarch, and he had resolved to destroy the Land of Oz and its magnificent Emerald City, to enslave Princess Ozma and little Dorothy and all the Oz people, and recover his Magic Belt.
Summary: New Delhi [India] ANI 14 (ANI/NewsVoir): DIACOLOR a high luxury jewellery brand, reputed worldwide as a design destination where choicest gems and precious metals come together to create exceptional jewellery, under the expert craftsmanship of its artisans, acquires the most expensive Zambian Emerald rough The Inkalamu (Lion) Emerald, recently at the Gemfields auction.
Measuring 6x4mm with 0.4 carat of precious emeralds set in gold plated 925 sterling silver, these earrings are the perfect finishing touch.
The Dubai Court of Appeals upheld the lower court's verdict in a case where three Asian persons were convicted of possessing smuggled emeralds worth nearly Dh11 million.
The impressive glittering set of gems, which consists of more than 20 loose emeralds, is far more expensive than diamonds and will be sold to the highest bidder by Guernsey's Auction House in New York, USA.