Office of Price Administration

(redirected from Emergency Price Control Act)

Office of Price Administration

(OPA), U.S. federal agency in World War II, established to prevent wartime inflation. The OPA issued (Apr., 1942) a general maximum-price regulation that made prices charged in Mar., 1942, the ceiling prices for most commodities. Ceilings were also imposed on residential rents. These regulations were gradually modified and extended by OPA administrators—notably Leon HendersonHenderson, Leon,
1895–1986, American economist, administrator of the Office of Price Administration (1941–42), b. Millville, N.J. An official of the Russell Sage Foundation (1925–34), Henderson held several posts as economic adviser in the administration of
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 (1941–42), Prentiss H. Brown (1943), and Chester B. BowlesBowles, Chester Bliss
, 1901–86, U.S. public official, b. Springfield, Mass.; grandson of Samuel Bowles (1851–1915). At first a journalist and an advertising man, Bowles was later (1942–43) head of the Connecticut Office of Price Administration (OPA) and then
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 (1943–46)—until almost 90% of the retail food prices were frozen. Prices continued to rise, however, and new drives to secure compliance resulted; ultimately the OPA succeeded in keeping consumer prices relatively stable during the remaining war years. Besides controlling prices, the OPA was also empowered to ration scarce consumer goods in wartime. Tires, automobiles, sugar, gasoline, fuel oil, coffee, meats, and processed foods were ultimately rationed. At the end of the war rationing was abandoned, and price controls were gradually abolished. The agency was finally disbanded in 1947.
References in periodicals archive ?
Roosevelt's Emergency Price Control Act of 1942, and Federal freezing of New York City rents.
While Congress was burning up seven months dickering over the Emergency Price Control Act that FDR requested, OPA was rushing ahead with its preparations.

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