emergency medicine

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emergency medicine

[ə‚mər·jən·sē ′med·ə·sən]
(medicine)
The medical specialty that comprises the immediate decision making and action necessary to prevent death or further disability under emergency conditions.
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Among these include the efficiency and safety of high-acuity patient transports, including those external to the hospital (e.g., critical patients arriving by EMS and/or helicopter to the elevator-de-pendant emergency care center,) as well as intra-hospital patient transport (e.g., trauma patient transit from the second floor to the ICU or OR).
"The emergency care support worker will drive the ambulance and the paramedic will look after the patient.
All components of the emergency care system (from emergency medical services to emergency departments) should fully coordinate their activities and integrate communications to ensure seamless emergency services.
Gaskin pointed out another little-known fact about emergency care: In some states, first responders and emergency medical technicians (EMTs) don't get paid unless they transport patients to a hospital.
The IOM panel recommended that Congress establish a single lead agency to oversee and manage emergency care, pulling together resources that are now currently overseen by an array of departments within various agencies, including the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Department of Transportation.
Children represent 27% of the country's 110 million emergency visits, but they often inappropriately receive adult-sized care, according to a committee report on emergency care for children.
"Americans assume they will receive lifesaving emergency care when and where they need it, but increasingly that isn't the case," said Dr.
However, the ADA code does not fully address some of the other circumstances that may occur when patients seek emergency care during off-hours.
Payments for emergency care have declined substantially in recent years, according to a study by the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Ill.
More than half of patients at such emergency care facilities are children, but the number of centers capable of providing sufficient care is very limited, the survey shows.
Gate keeping is the cornerstone of managed care, however, ensuring timely access to emergency care continues to be a challenge since many serious conditions often present clinically the same as urgent or non-urgent conditions.
How managed care is putting emergency care into shock

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