Emergence

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emergence

[ə′mər·jəns]
(geology)
Dry land which was part of the ocean floor.
The act or process of becoming an emergent land mass.
(hydrology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Emergence

 

an outgrowth on the surface of stems and leaves formed, in contrast to hair, not only by the epidermis but by underlying tissues. Emergences include the stinging hairs of nettle, the thorns on rose stems and thorn apples, and the glandular hairs on sundew (Drosera).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This enabled us to gauge the effect of the time step size (and of the resulting discretization and rounding errors) on the observed emergent behaviour. Since the time-evolution of our scenario was rather fast, it was sufficient for each simulation to cover just 90 seconds of simulated time.
In one of our scenarios, this model exhibited a puzzling emergent behaviour: simulations with the same input parameter setting bifurcated along two different trajectories.
Ideally, when decomposing a swarm world into smaller parts, the same emergent behaviour has to be exhibited at a smaller scale down to some smallest collaborating part (e.g.
In this paper we study explicit state model checking as a potential method for emergent behaviour analysis of swarms.
Engineers should be provided with a guide including models, tools and methods to design systems having an emergent behaviour or presenting emergent results.
However there are also disadvantages which are essentially related with harnessing emergent behaviour. Firstly, it is currently not possible to effectively control the behaviour of such systems.
It is the tool of choice to understand motivations and emergent behaviours, and to derive insights at a more aggregate level.

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