Emerson

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Emerson

Ralph Waldo. . 1803--82, US poet, essayist, and transcendentalist
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At the same time, Huck's character is also decidedly Emersonian because of his take on nature and his self-reliant qualities (25).
One such question entails the necessary methods in making the most of Emerson's ideas, the reflective practices that allow a reader to connect with Emersonian provocations, to connect those provocations to others, and to connect the literary provocations to the larger text (nature, the world, the hodiernal circle) in which they yet circulate.
We can, in this way, begin to conceive how Emersonian optimism functions: an orientation toward the symptoms of an imperfect and incomplete reality is what allows one to enjoy shamelessly--for, in Emerson's view, Reason is the hidden cause of these glorious perforations in the world.
Mailer had given up his Emersonian illusions about originality and self-reinvention.
In the first part of the paper, I examine Stanley Cavell's suggestion put forward in his Carus Lectures of 1988 that Beckett's play can be read as a work which embodies and develops the idea of Emersonian moral perfectionism (1990, 3).
I will attempt to show how the Emersonian first American Renaissance and the Nashville Agrarian Southern Renaissance, though emerging from very different regions and societal milieus in the United States, sprouted from and were nourished by a common soil of cultural, religious, historical and philosophical conditions and propensities.
The first half of the chapter shows how the poet responded to the Emersonian call (Ranciere quotes from Emerson's 1841 lecture "The Poet") to the point that, as Ranciere puts it, his poetry became the incarnation of Emerson's program: Whitman became the new poet who gave spiritual meaning to prosaic and material activities.
If this appears out-of-date to today's self-assured intellectual cynicism, Loreto's exposition of Walcott's Emersonian poetics remains absolutely convincing.
While responsive to the Emersonian call to slough off the past, Hawthorne ...
stereotypes of Emerson as a self-created Romantic visionary who rejected the past," I disagree that Emersonian self-reliance is "the most striking expression by an American of a historic international shift in the very structure of sentiment and feeling." (14) Emerson instead maintains a Platonic idealism inherent to early New England's predominant theology and philosophy, contributions to American thought that he seeks to refine rather than replace.
As they put it in the Introduction, from shortly after his death, Emerson was understood primarily as an advocate of "apolitical individualism." Levine and Malachuk structure their collection around a historical division between four "Classics on Emerson's Politics" that treat public life as an implicit rather than explicit topic of Emerson's work, and nine original essays that make the case for seeing Emersonian self-reliance as intentionally political.