emetic

(redirected from Emetics)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Emetics: Antiemetics, ipecac

emetic

(əmĕt`ĭk), substance that produces vomiting. Direct, or gastric, emetics, which act directly on the stomach, include syrup of ipecacipecac
, drug obtained from the dried roots of a creeping shrub, Cephaelis (or Psychotria) ipecacuanha, native to Brazil but cultivated in other tropical climates.
..... Click the link for more information.
, sulfate of zinc or copper, alumalum
, any one of a series of isomorphous double salts that are hydrated sulfates of a univalent cation (e.g., potassium, sodium, ammonium, cesium, or thallium) and a trivalent cation (e.g., aluminum, chromium, iron, manganese, cobalt, or titanium).
..... Click the link for more information.
, ammonium carbonate, mustard in water, or copious quantities of warm saltwater. Indirect, or systemic, emetics, such as apomorphine, induce vomiting by acting indirectly through the blood on the brain center that controls vomiting. Emetics are not used to treat poisoning by strong acids or alkalis, petroleum distillates such as kerosene, or substances causing convulsions.

Emetic

 

an agent that induces vomiting. Emetics are distinguished according to whether they act on the vomiting center in the brain (for example, apomorphine) or whether they irritate the mucous membrane of the stomach and reflexly excite the stomach’s vomiting center (ipecac or thermopsis). Emetics are used to counteract the effects of poisoning and to treat chronic alcoholism. For example, an injection of apomorphine combined with ingestion of alcohol leads to a conditioned reflex causing the taste and odor of alcohol to induce vomiting. When taken in small doses, emetics act as expectorants.

emetic

[i′med·ik]
(pharmacology)
Any agent that induces emesis.

emetic

1. causing vomiting
2. an emetic agent or drug
References in periodicals archive ?
(18) Treatment class Treatment plan Bleeding and Stimulant Venesection (8 oz), salt and mustard emetics, hot water enemata, mustard cataplasms (externally), brandy, ammonia and cayenne pepper (internally).
In the late postoperative period dexamethasone significantly reduced both incidence and severity of nausea and vomiting (p<0.001) and also the need for rescue emetics. There was no untoward effects of drug reported in the postoperative period.
Incidence of emetic episodes were also high in the study by Bhattacharya and Banerjee P (20% in Ondansetron group, 7% in Granisetron group and 50% in placebo), whereas the incidence of emetic episodes was less in the present study (6.6% in both groups).
Emetic stimuli entering the general circulation can trigger the nerve receptors in the CTZ directly because, unlike the rest of the central nervous system, this region of the brainstem has a reduced blood-brain barrier.
* a 2-drug combination of 5HT3 antagonist and dexamethasone for chemotherapy with moderate emetic risk.
When rushed to the emergency department during the emetic phase, CVS patients can present with blood in the vomitus due to prolapse gastropathy or Mallory-Weiss tears resulting from forceful heaves, erosive esophagitis, and aspiration.
The length of the recovery period reflects the adequacy of management of the emetic phase.
Hypovolemia and pain also have "powerful" emetic effects, he added.
After 10 mm, copper sulfate anhydride was administered orally in a dose of 50 mg/kg, then the number of retching (an emetic action without vomiting gastric materials) was recorded during the next to mm.
Post operative nausea and vomiting was measured using the PONV scoring system described by Wilson et al and later used by Pandey et al.29 There are several studies which suggest that midazolam, when used pre-operatively, significantly reduces post-operative nausea and vomiting when administered either per oral or as intravenous formulations.30,31 On comparing the two groups, nine (30%) patients in group A and 13 (43.3 %) in group B had mild nausea or single emetic episode (PONV score 2) at the end of first post-operative hour.