Emigrant


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Emigrant

 

in biology, an animal that leaves its natural habitat, migrating beyond the boundaries of its accustomed area of distribution. The migration of such animals is frequently massive and is usually related to mass reproduction, which results in a shortage of food and, therefore, in the departure of animals from their natural habitat. Examples of emigrants are lemmings, squirrels, nutcrackers, Pallas’s sandgrouse, various species of swarming locusts, and sometimes the steppe lemming (Lagurus lagurus), as well as butterflies and their caterpillars and dragonflies.

Emigrants perish in large numbers while moving. Some drown when crossing rivers, and many fall victim to predators. They frequently fail to find a suitable new habitat and die. There have been some cases in which animals’ areas of distribution have been expanded as a result of migration. Examples in the 20th century include the population of Kamchatka by squirrels in the 1920’s and the population of the Antilles Islands by the buff-backed heron (Bubulcus ibis) in the 1930’s.

References in periodicals archive ?
With greater education, financial means, health, and youth, Russian Jewish emigrants stood out from their nonemigrant counterparts.
Male emigrant students don't face the same challenge because they may travel to their home country alone to complete their higher education, either living with a relative or renting a room.
Gateway to a Thousand Worlds" is the motto of this year's fest, which coincides with the opening of museum and exhibition center BallinStadt Emigration World Hamburg, which doesn't try to hide the fact many emigrants were treated poorly on their way out of Europe by Germany's second city.
NEEDY Irish emigrants living in Britain should have access to cash from abandoned bank accounts, Fine Gael said yesterday.
Then the mayor, Isabella Difloria, came to me and embraced and kissed me and said they were going to have a free festival for the emigrants.
EUR12million is to be spent on emigrants this year - an increase of almost EUR4million on last year.
While some might question this sweeping assertion, the author clearly feels a great personal passion for the subject, which he refers to as a "labour of love" and which he links to his own personal experience of emigration (albeit to Oxford and Brussels); this experience gave him, he notes, an appreciation for "the feeling of exile and love of one's country the nineteenth-century emigrants must have felt" (9).
Second, in terms of his interpretations of Irish rural society, of landlord or official British culpability for emigrant sufferings, and of the condition of the emigrants abroad, Dr.
He highlights the changing nature of perceptions of emigrant Mexicans by the sending country, particularly in view of President Vicente Fox's reconceptualization of these emigrants as heroes rather than as deserters.
Considering the size of emigrant populations today, these contributions to emerging-market economies, if actively promoted, could be more substantial still.
10) Dancing at these wakes embodied this duality by affirming the ties to one's home and family, while also setting in motion the withdrawal of the emigrant from the community.
The book is divided into three parts, the first dealing with the historical background to Anglo-German relations, the second an indepth study of emigrant families in both realms, and the third an investigation of the cultural and religious ties between German and English peoples.