Galle

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Galle

(gäl), city (1995 est. pop. 87,000), capital of Southern prov., extreme S Sri Lanka, on the Indian Ocean. An agricultural market center, it exports tea, rubber, coconut oil, cloves, and other products of the surrounding region. The city has a cement factory as well. Famous as a trade center for Chinese and Arabs by 100 B.C., Galle rose to prominence under Portuguese rule (1507–1640), when it became Sri Lanka's chief port. It was the capital of Sri Lanka under the Dutch (1640–56), whose original fort, built to guard the harbor, still stands. The city passed to the British in 1796. Its commercial importance continued until the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 and the construction (1885) by the British of a modern harbor at Colombo. Since the 1960s congestion and labor problems at the port of Colombo have diverted some shipping to Galle. In Dec., 2004, Galle was devastated by a tsunami caused by an earthquake off N Sumatra.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gallé

 

work in nontransparent multilayered glass, decorated with plant and landscape motifs in relief; also the technique of carving the glass around the design by removing several layers, which makes the design stand out as a silhouette against the transparent background. Named after the creator of the first vases of this kind, the French artist E. Gallé (1846-1904), this style has been adopted by many masters of the art nouveau style in Europe and the United States.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Galle

a port in SW Sri Lanka; along with other coastal settlements, it suffered badly in the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004. Pop.: 123 616 (1997 est.)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
A vase by Emile Galle. A candelabra by Juste-Aurele Meissonnier, designer; and Claude Duvivier, silversmith.
Jean Prouve (1901-1984) at the Musee des Beaux-Arts (until 15 October) claims to tackle 'all aspects of his talent and personality', starting with the influence of his father and godfather, the artists Victor Prouve and Emile Galle, both of whom were closely involved with the vigorous local flowering of Art Nouveau known as the Ecole de Nancy.
Besides numerous masterpieces by Emile Galle, the undisputed glassmaker of the period, the visitor will discover a harmonious group of over 150 vases, cups, flasks and lamps signed by the leading glass artists of the turn of the century: Daum, Tiffany, Loetz, Argy-Rousseau.
ITEMS of quality and beauty will always hold their value, as with this beautiful vase by Emile Galle.
You will find furniture, glass and metal from this period in the sale with pieces by some of the big name designers including Louis Majorelle, Emile Galle, Edouard Colonna, Jacques Gruber, Hector Guimard, Daum Freres, Edgar Brandt and Portois and Fix.
Salvador, originally from Barcelona in Spain, had moved to Lyon in France where he joined the School of Nancy in 1909, that had been established a few years earlier by Emile Galle.
You will also find pieces of Art Nouveau in the sale, including a beautiful selection of cameo glass lamps by Emile Galle.
While in France, he met Emile Galle who was producing art glass.