emperor

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emperor

[Lat. imperator=one holding supreme power, especially applied to generals], the sovereign head of an empire. In the Roman republic the term imperator referred to the chief military commander and was used only on the battlefield. It was first used continuously by Julius Caesar and was retained by his successor Augustus. It was then adopted by all succeeding Roman rulers as an official title. An emperor continuously ruled over the eastern segment of the Roman Empire, which became known as the Byzantine Empire, until the 15th cent. In the West, after the fall of the empire, the title was revived with the crowning of Charlemagne (800). Eventually the territory reigned over by the successors of Charlemagne became known as the Holy Roman Empire, which lasted until 1806. In 1721 the Russian czar Peter I adopted the title emperor, and his example was followed in the 19th cent. by the monarchs in Austria, France, Germany, and Great Britain (Indian Empire, 1877–1947). The title was also used by several rulers in the Americas—in Brazil from 1822 to 1889; in Mexico by Agustín de Iturbide and Maximilian; and in Haiti by Jean Jacques Dessalines and Henri Christophe. In a general sense the title has been used to describe a non-European ruler of considerable territory, e.g., the emperor of Japan and the emperor of Ethiopia. See also imperialismimperialism,
broadly, the extension of rule or influence by one government, nation, or society over another. Early Empires

Evidence of the existence of empires dates back to the dawn of written history in Egypt and in Mesopotamia, where local rulers extended their
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.

Emperor

 

a monarchical title. In ancient Rome the word imperium initially referred to the supreme power (military, juridical, and administrative) of the highest magistrates, including consuls, praetors, and dictators. From the period of Augustus and his successors the title of emperor in the Roman Empire took on a monarchical character. Beginning with the reign of Diocletian, the Roman Empire was ruled by two emperors with the title of Augustus; their two co-rulers held the title of caesar. With the fall of the Western Roman Empire (476) the title of emperor was retained in the East, in Byzantium; in the West it was restored by Charlemagne (800) and later by the German king Otto I (from 962, the emperor of the Holy Roman Empire). Subsequently the title was adopted by the monarchs of certain other states, including the Russian emperor, beginning in 1721, and the Austrian emperor, from 1804. In European literature the term “emperor” is applied to the monarchs of a number of non-European states, such as the Chinese emperor (until 1911) and the Japanese emperor.

Emperor

orders a new outfit from weavers who claim it will be invisible to anyone unworthy of his position. [Dan. Lit.: Andersen “The Emperor’s New Clothes” in Andersen’s Fairy Tales]

emperor

1. a monarch who rules or reigns over an empire
2. any of several large saturniid moths with eyelike markings on each wing, esp Saturnia pavonia of Europe
References in classic literature ?
He asked if any would like to know what the Emperor of the East was doing now?
While we were at Diou, waiting for these vessels, we received advice from Aethiopia that the emperor, unwilling to expose the patriarch to any hazard, thought Dagher, a port in the mouth of the Red Sea, belonging to a prince dependent on the Abyssins, a place of the greatest security to land at, having already written to that prince to give him safe passage through his dominions.
Its powers are vested in a diet representing the component members of the confederacy; in the emperor, who is the executive magistrate, with a negative on the decrees of the diet; and in the imperial chamber and the aulic council, two judiciary tribunals having supreme jurisdiction in controversies which concern the empire, or which happen among its members.
Such are those to whom some state is given either for money or by the favour of him who bestows it; as happened to many in Greece, in the cities of Ionia and of the Hellespont, where princes were made by Darius, in order that they might hold the cities both for his security and his glory; as also were those emperors who, by the corruption of the soldiers, from being citizens came to empire.
Yes," added the other; "and of the Roman emperors as low as Severus; besides a great deal of the heathen mythology, and all the metals, semi-metals, planets, and distinguished philosophers.
In the flourishing times of the Roman Empire, it was the ordinary station of the prefect of the eastern provinces; and many of the emperors of the queen city (among whom may be mentioned, especially, Verus and Valens) spent here the greater part of their time.
But that honor, perhaps were not fit for monarchies; except it be in the person of the monarch himself, or his sons; as it came to pass in the times of the Roman emperors, who did impropriate the actual triumphs to themselves, and their sons, for such wars as they did achieve in person; and left only, for wars achieved by subjects, some triumphal garments and ensigns to the general.
I'll take you to some jolly old-fashioned place-- the Bristol say--" leaving his father speechless at hearing that the century-long home of kings and emperors was now spoken of as an old-fashioned inn, where one went for its quaint inconveniences and lingering local colour.
The officer saluted again and fell back, the New Jersey sprite bowed in return and had presence of mind enough to pretend that he had simply called on a matter of private business with those emperors, and so waved them an adieu and drove from the field!
But emperors and rich men are by no means the most skilful masters of good manners.
Messeigneurs, emperors, and kings," said Gringoire coolly
The author diverts the emperor, and his nobility of both sexes, in a very uncommon manner.