empire

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empire

1. an aggregate of peoples and territories, often of great extent, under the rule of a single person, oligarchy, or sovereign state
2. any monarchy that for reasons of history, prestige, etc., has an emperor rather than a king as head of state
3. the period during which a particular empire exists
4. supreme power; sovereignty
5. a large industrial organization with many ramifications, esp a multinational corporation

Empire

 

(1) The name for a monarchical state headed by an emperor. An empire is most often a vast state that has incorporated, usually by conquest, the territory of other peoples and states. Some empires included several kingdoms. The Roman state was called an empire after Augustus established the individual power of the emperor in the late first century B.C. Later empires included Byzantium; the Frankish state under Charlemagne, who adopted the title of emperor in 800; and the medieval Holy Roman Empire. Tsarist Russia was an empire from the time of Peter I (1721) until the overthrow of the monarchy in 1917. Other examples of empires are bourgeois France under Napoleon I (the First Empire) and Napoleon III (the Second Empire), Austria from 1804 (Austria-Hungary from 1868) until 1918, and Germany from 1871 until the revolution of 1918.

(2) Large states that have vast colonial possessions. The empire consists of the mother country and its colonies—for example, the British empire included Great Britain and all of its dominions and colonies.

empire

(games)
Any of a family of military simulations derived from a game written by Peter Langston many years ago. Five or six multi-player variants of varying degrees of sophistication exist, and one single-player version implemented for both Unix and VMS; the latter is even available as MS-DOS freeware. All are notoriously addictive.
References in classic literature ?
But I shall not anticipate the reader with further descriptions of this kind, because I reserve them for a greater work, which is now almost ready for the press; containing a general description of this empire, from its first erection, through along series of princes; with a particular account of their wars and politics, laws, learning, and religion; their plants and animals; their peculiar manners and customs, with other matters very curious and useful; my chief design at present being only to relate such events and transactions as happened to the public or to myself during a residence of about nine months in that empire.
Nearly a century ago, one of those rare minds to whom it is given to discern future greatness in its seminal principles, upon contemplating the situation of this continent, pronounced, in a vein of poetic inspiration, "Westward the star of empire takes its way.
For hundred of year the Byzantine Empire stood as a barrier against the Saracen hosts of Asia.
Epoch after epoch, camp, kingdom, empire, republic, democracy, are merely the application of his manifold spirit to the manifold world.
Temperance, tolerance, and sexual equality were intelligible cries to them; whereas they did not follow our Forward Policy in Thibet with the keen attention that it merits, and would at times dismiss the whole British Empire with a puzzled, if reverent, sigh.
The empire of Abyssinia hath been one of the largest which history gives us an account of: it extended formerly from the Red Sea to the kingdom of Congo, and from Egypt to the Indian Sea.
Among the most formidable of the obstacles which the new Constitution will have to encounter may readily be distinguished the obvious interest of a certain class of men in every State to resist all changes which may hazard a diminution of the power, emolument, and consequence of the offices they hold under the State establishments; and the perverted ambition of another class of men, who will either hope to aggrandize themselves by the confusions of their country, or will flatter themselves with fairer prospects of elevation from the subdivision of the empire into several partial confederacies than from its union under one government.
Hearken not to the unnatural voice which tells you that the people of America, knit together as they are by so many cords of affection, can no longer live together as members of the same family; can no longer continue the mutual guardians of their mutual happiness; can no longer be fellow citizens of one great, respectable, and flourishing empire.
Considering the difficulties which men have had to hold to a newly acquired state, some might wonder how, seeing that Alexander the Great became the master of Asia in a few years, and died whilst it was scarcely settled (whence it might appear reasonable that the whole empire would have rebelled), nevertheless his successors maintained themselves, and had to meet no other difficulty than that which arose among themselves from their own ambitions.
Neither is it the acme of excellence if you fight and conquer and the whole Empire says, "Well done
It looked as if the easterly weather had come to stay for ever, or, at least, till we had all starved to death in the held-up fleet - starved within sight, as it were, of plenty, within touch, almost, of the bountiful heart of the Empire.
Awakened now to the danger that menaced the establishment at Astoria, and aware of the importance of protecting this foothold of American commerce and empire on the shores of the Pacific, the government determined to send the frigate Adams, Captain Crane, upon this service.