Empirical Psychology

Empirical Psychology

 

psychology based on experience, as distinguished from rational psychology, which is based on speculation. Empirical psychology took shape within the mainstream of English empiricism in Great Britain during the 18th and 19th centuries (D. Hartley, James Mill, John Stuart Mill, A. Bain, and H. Spencer), as well as in France in the second half of the 19th century (H. Taine and T. Ribot). Despite the limitations of the empirical psychologists’ conception of consciousness (which in their view was what the subject matter of psychology amounted to), empirical psychology played an important role in experimental studies of psychic phenomena.

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One of Zagzebski's impressive achievements in this book is providing a richly worked-out articulation of the relation between moral philosophy and empirical psychology, a desideratum often missing in contemporary moral theory.
From a cognitive psychology perspective, classification is a fundamental cognitive function of the brain, and the process of assigning a stimulus to a particular social category is generally considered an automatic process in empirical psychology research (Smith & DeCoster, 2000).
This leads him to the view that empirical psychology might be 'virtue's demise' (163).
At least in the first place, it brackets out other areas of doctrine apart from theological anthropology, and brackets out empirical psychology, focusing down on the metaphysics of the human person with which empirical psychology is intertwined.
The first three chapters cover these early developments, while the second section focuses on 19th-century German experimental psychology and empirical psychology in tradition of William James.
Can an empirical psychology be drawn from Husserl's phenomenology?
As yet, however, the empirical psychology of religion has remained largely shaped within the Christian tradition and, to a lesser extent, within the Jewish tradition.
Two of the best examples are Roland Borgards's 'Kopf ab', on the discussion surrounding the invention of the guillotine and the question of knowledge regarding the pain of those executed, and Harald Neumeyer's 'Unkalkulierbar unbewusst: Zur Seele des Verbrechers um 1800', a reading of the interaction between criminal justice and empirical psychology.
This in turn will allow us to take a Jamesian look at some contemporary approaches to healthy-mindedness in empirical psychology.
It is the business of transcendental philosophy to explore what characterizes a subjective perspective, not to attempt to explain any facts causally or ontically, as does empirical psychology.
It ignores or is unfamiliar with empirical psychology and its potential insights.

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