empirical

(redirected from Empirical content)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

empirical

1. (of medical treatment) based on practical experience rather than scientific proof
2. Philosophy
a. (of knowledge) derived from experience rather than by logic from first principles
b. (of a proposition) subject, at least theoretically, to verification
3. of or relating to medical quackery

empirical

  1. derived from systematic observation or experiment, as against speculative assertion or merely theoretical knowledge.
  2. factually true but, as yet, theoretically unexplained. See also EMPIRICISM, ABSTRACTED EMPIRICISM, EMPIRICAL SOCIOLOGY.

empirical

[em′pir·ə·kəl]
(science and technology)
Based on actual measurement, observation, or experience, rather than on theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
The function of empirical content therefore results in the concept not being essentially contested.
Bergstrom posits that Quine's empiricism motivates the ecumenic position whereas naturalism motivates sectarianism: Quine identifies empirical equivalence and sameness of empirical content.
7) Therefore, I have no knowledge, of any mental state with empirical content p, that p is true.
Regarding the RBV's nomic necessity--the causal nature of a theory that guarantees that any related phenomenon does not occur by spurious relationships or confounding variables--Priem and Butler do not even bother to examine it given the absence of empirical content that its tautological nature allegedly evidences (Priem & Butler, 2001a).
What we are doing is examining the empirical content of mathematically complex publications in economics.
Brewer is trying to argue that unless perceptual experiences provide reasons for belief (in a sense that would be incompatible with, for example, any pure reliabilism), there simply cannot be beliefs with empirical content at all.
Then, of course, Schlick's 'foundations' are themselves devoid of empirical content and, as such, cannot provide any evidential warrant for the remaining claims of science.
Yet, comparing the empirical content of rival theories turns out to be especially difficult in practice, which helps explain why "neither Lakatos nor his followers have been able to identify any historical case to which the Lakatosian definition of progress can be shown strictly to apply" (Laudan 1977, 77; see also Grunbaum 1976a; McCloskey 1994, chapter 7).
Given his inferential semantics, a natural suggestion would be to claim that perceptual reports have empirical content partly in virtue of their inferential connections with the way the world is given the subject's position in it.
117) is not, in fact, the minimization of empirical content.
First, to a significant degree they are "derived from deductive economic theory built on a few abstract axioms, with poor empirical content and not proven in reality" (p.
The rise to prominence of logical positivism and its variant, logical empiricism, furthered this mode of analysis by including empirical content as the means of making the discipline more scientific.