Empusa

(redirected from Empousa)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Empusa

 

a genus of fungi of the order Entomophthorales. The fungi are parasites of insects. The spores, or conidia, sprout upon landing on the insect; they form a mycelium, which penetrates the insect’s body and proliferates. Toxins secreted by the fungus destroy all the insect’s internal organs.

There are about 20 species. The most widespread are E. aulicae and E. grylli. The former causes mass destruction of the pine beauty moth, the gold-tail moth, and the lackey moth—all dangerous pests of timber crops. E. grylli parasitizes grasshoppers (Acrididae). Some mycologists include the Empusa in the genus Entomophthora.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
We might say then that Empousa is a primordial creature who emblematizes everything a proper woman, wife, and mother should not be.
The figure of Empousa is an effective counterweight to the way that mothers and other women have often been constructed in the Western philosophical tradition: as part of a set of fixed oppositions that underlie and support this tradition (e.
How would such figures of mythology as Empousa have achieved human form in the first century B.
Let us now turn to several of Propertius's memorable mothers and view them in this context of Empousa and other demonic mother figures.
Further, the mother, represented as a theriomorphic figure here, reminds us again of demon figures like Empousa, who were often presented as possessing wild animal traits and features.
To return to the figure of Empousa, I see in the changeable figures of mothers, and women in general, inheritors of the shape-shifting monsters of the earliest Greek imaginary: ancient figures like Empousa, Medea, Pandora, and--to bring us down to contemporary times--Sigourney Weaver's character in the movie "Ghostbusters," Dana Barrett, the beautiful cellist who turns into the Terror Dog of the Sumerian god Gozer.
See also the Vita Aeschines, where it is stated that Aeschines' mother was "accustomed to rush out of dark places to frighten women and children, and was nicknamed Empousa, therefore, because Empousa was a [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].