emu

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emu

or

emeu

(both: ē`myo͞o), common name for a large, flightless bird of Australia, related to the cassowarycassowary
, common name for a flightless, swift-running, pugnacious forest bird of Australia and the Malay Archipelago, smaller than the ostrich and emu. The plumage is dark and glossy and the head and neck unfeathered, wattled, and brilliantly colored, with variations in the
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 and the ostrichostrich,
common name for a large flightless bird (Struthio camelus) of Africa and parts of SW Asia, allied to the rhea, the emu and the extinct moa. It is the largest of living birds; some males reach a height of 8 ft (244 cm) and weigh from 200 to 300 lb (90–135
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. There is only one living species, Dromaius novaehollandiae. It is 5 to 6 ft (150–180 cm) tall and a very swift runner. The head and neck are feathered. The six or seven dark green eggs, laid in a sandy pit, are sometimes incubated by the male and require 56 days to hatch. The emu is easily tamed. Emus are raised for meat and eggs, leather, and oil, which is rendered from their fat. The emu is classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Struthioniformes, family Dromaiidae.

emu

[′ē‚myü]
(electromagnetism)
(vertebrate zoology)
Dromiceius novae-hollandiae. An Australian ratite bird, the second largest living bird, characterized by rudimentary wings and a feathered head and neck without wattles.

emu

a large Australian flightless bird, Dromaius novaehollandiae, similar to the ostrich but with three-toed feet and grey or brown plumage: order Casuariiformes

EMU

(Economic and Monetary Union) The consolidation of European currencies into one monetary unit called the "euro," which phased in on January 1, 1999. Accounting systems that dealt with the currencies of the participating countries had to deal with both native and euro values. On January 1, 2002, euro notes and coins were made available, with national currencies withdrawn by March 1 of that year. Public and private companies spent more than $150 billion (USD equivalent) modifying their information systems. As of January 1, 2015, the following countries use the euro:


Austria
Belgium
Cyprus
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Ireland
Italy
Latvia
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Malta
Netherlands
Portugal
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
References in periodicals archive ?
Now, unlike the magpie, the raven and the mynah, the emu is a bird one won't see too much of, yet I'm told its numbers are sufficiently plentiful as to place it under the category of 'not threatened species'.
I shipped 70 emus from my farm last fall for processing but, at present, I only have my six breeder pairs now for a total of 12 emus," she says.
Five metres away the emu is butting at a five-strand fence but can't work out that there is an opening there that it can get through.
Reports of successful reproduction and survival of free-ranging emus suggests that this species has potential to colonize and invade habitats occupied by native species.
Shelter workers got emu food from a feed store and supplemented that with alfalfa and hay.
AN EMU chick has defied the odds to hatch out of an egg in an Irish farm just in time for Easter - with a little help from her father.
This is the latest fluffy addition to Jack and Vera's fledgling family - the resident emu pair at Drayton Manor Park Zoo in Staffordshire.
When people feed emus, the birds become tame and often hang out where people are.
Researchers of Medical Physiology at the University of Saskatchewan have found that the oil, when applied to post-operative wounds, promotes healing, while the Department of Pathology and Microbiology at the University of Prince Edward Island's Atlantic Veterinary College has discovered that emu oil reduces auricular inflammation in mice.
Even product animals like emus may eventually be slaughtered for no reason, if the supply increases while the demand stays limited.
A wing gene that keeps emus on the ground instead of flying through the air with other bird species is giving scientists a clue about how to prevent birth defects in humans.
1 The contract is for the modernization of EMUs EN57 series.