emu

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emu

or

emeu

(both: ē`myo͞o), common name for a large, flightless bird of Australia, related to the cassowarycassowary
, common name for a flightless, swift-running, pugnacious forest bird of Australia and the Malay Archipelago, smaller than the ostrich and emu. The plumage is dark and glossy and the head and neck unfeathered, wattled, and brilliantly colored, with variations in the
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 and the ostrichostrich,
common name for a large flightless bird (Struthio camelus) of Africa and parts of SW Asia, allied to the rhea, the emu and the extinct moa. It is the largest of living birds; some males reach a height of 8 ft (244 cm) and weigh from 200 to 300 lb (90–135
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. There is only one living species, Dromaius novaehollandiae. It is 5 to 6 ft (150–180 cm) tall and a very swift runner. The head and neck are feathered. The six or seven dark green eggs, laid in a sandy pit, are sometimes incubated by the male and require 56 days to hatch. The emu is easily tamed. Emus are raised for meat and eggs, leather, and oil, which is rendered from their fat. The emu is classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Struthioniformes, family Dromaiidae.

emu

[′ē‚myü]
(electromagnetism)
(vertebrate zoology)
Dromiceius novae-hollandiae. An Australian ratite bird, the second largest living bird, characterized by rudimentary wings and a feathered head and neck without wattles.

emu

a large Australian flightless bird, Dromaius novaehollandiae, similar to the ostrich but with three-toed feet and grey or brown plumage: order Casuariiformes

EMU

(Economic and Monetary Union) The consolidation of European currencies into one monetary unit called the "euro," which phased in on January 1, 1999. Accounting systems that dealt with the currencies of the participating countries had to deal with both native and euro values. On January 1, 2002, euro notes and coins were made available, with national currencies withdrawn by March 1 of that year. Public and private companies spent more than $150 billion (USD equivalent) modifying their information systems. As of January 1, 2015, the following countries use the euro:


Austria
Belgium
Cyprus
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Ireland
Italy
Latvia
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Malta
Netherlands
Portugal
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
References in periodicals archive ?
If emus are left to graze and given no supplemental feed, it is estimated that they will require 15 to 20 pounds of forage per day.
A final decision on the emu underpasses will be made later in the year but Whale said he was pessimistic about the birds ever using them, given their lack of intelligence - a problem that can make it hard simply to shoo them out of fenced fields.
Reports of successful reproduction and survival of free-ranging emus suggests that this species has potential to colonize and invade habitats occupied by native species.
Shelter workers got emu food from a feed store and supplemented that with alfalfa and hay.
She said they were thrilled to have become one of the first farms to have produced an emu chick in a natural environment.
The Binfords have worked with physicians, including Dan Dean of Michigan, who has used emu oil to achieve outstanding results in wound healing and diabetic patients.
3 The Purchaser reserves the right option involving the assignment of the Contractor overhaul with modernization of the next 1 or 2 units of EMUs outside the minimum amount specified above, the upgrade will be passed to no more than 4 units of EMUs.
Gajapati (Orissa), May 29 (ANI): Farmers of Orissa's Gajapati District have discovered a new way to make money through Emu farming, or 'golden farming' as it is popularly known.
ACTON -- An emu can run up to 30 mph, something an Acton family found out the hard way when one of the two exotic birds they recently purchased flew the coop.
I never knew the industry was this large," said Ford, who conducted the study within AEA farms which may contain about half of the emus in the nation.
Duncan and Bitsy Cartwright have raised emus since 1989, when they first saw this odd bird at the Houston Livestock Show.