Encarta

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Encarta

Microsoft's digital encyclopedia. Launched in 1993 on CD-ROM, Encarta was initially based on the Funk & Wagnalls Encyclopedia and later augmented with the inclusion of Collier's and New Merit Scholar's Encyclopedias. With approximately 60,000 articles, compared to Wikipedia's nearly three million, Encarta was discontinued in 2009.
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It announced in March the discontinuation of both versions of its Encarta encyclopedia.
The search engine also features direct answers from Microsoft's popular Encarta encyclopedia.
Ian Chilvers, "Mathis Grunewald," The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990, 1996), 3, and "Matthias," Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia 2001, 1.
Encarta Reference Library 2004 also features Encarta Encyclopedia Deluxe 2004; Encarta World English Dictionary, Thesaurus, and Translation Dictionaries; Encarta Africana; more than 68,000 editor-reviewed articles; multimedia content, including live access to radio, news, and weather reports; virtual maps; and more.
The Encarta Encyclopedia 2001 features comprehensive articles, Web links, videos, animations, pictures and audio clips that help bring information to life.
I cannot fathom why anyone would waste time with such a database when far more current and comprehensive country profiles are freely available from such sources as the CIA World Factbook 2000 Information Please World Almanac, Britannica, the Concise Encarta Encyclopedia, or the 2000 edition of the Columbia Encyclopedia.
Microsoft's Encarta Encyclopedia Deluxe 2000 CD-ROM, which has been on sale since last October, triggered off public protest by a group of women' s rights activists and Thai Internet users.
A range of pre-loaded software is also featured including AT&T, Compuserve and AOL ISP software; Quicken Basic 99 and Microsoft Money 99; Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia 99, Microsoft Works, Efax.
Articles will also feature links for definitions from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary and links for geography references from Microsoft's Encarta encyclopedia.
Saami, living in the northernmost parts of Scandinavia and western Russia, were formerly known as Lapps or Laplanders, terms they consider derogatory, according to the Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia.