encumbrance

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encumbrance

, incumbrance
Law a burden or charge upon property, such as a mortgage or lien

encumbrance

A restriction on the use of real property, or an obligation to make a payment which is secured by real property and which does not prevent its conveyance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The director of the land registry department will strike any encumbrances on a property with a title deed before it is transferred.
Although the system does not support purchase orders, encumbrance reporting can be handled through the general ledger.
Method of encumbrance accounting and reporting (section 1700, paragraph .
The sale was conducted under Section 363 of the Bankruptcy Code, pursuant to which the assets were sold free and clear of all liens, claims and encumbrances.
The purpose of recording a lease is to protect the rights of innocent purchasers who acquire an interest in the property without knowledge of prior encumbrances; and to establish a public record which will furnish potential purchasers with notice of previous conveyances and encumbrances that might effect their interests and uses.
According to the court order, the assets acquired by Providential Holdings will be free and clear of all liens, interests and encumbrances, and Providential has no liability for any other liabilities of Western Medical, Inc.
CSX railroad now owns it and with government encumbrances now lifted, about 400 new luxury homes and townhomes will be created for sale around the grounds.
Marketable title" means the title is free from encumbrances and the purchaser can hold the land free from a probable claim by another.
by satisfying all encumbrances on the property and for general corporate purposes, including the completion of certain acquisitions to continue the planned growth and development of the Company.
Stockholders are also concerned about certain payments of zero coupon interest to shareholders, alleged encumbrances on the mortgage; and other issues.
Title insurance protects those who purchase real estate from encumbrances, such as liens or contested divorce settlements.