endogenous

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endogenous

Biology developing or originating within an organism or part of an organism
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

endogenous

[en′däj·ə·nəs]
(biochemistry)
Relating to the metabolism of nitrogenous tissue elements.
(geology)
(medicine)
Pertaining to diseases resulting from internal causes.
(psychology)
Pertaining to mental disorders caused by hereditary or constitutional factors.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been reported that endogeneous cannabinoids including anandamide show negative inotropic and antiarythmical action by way of voltage-gated sodium channels and L-type calcium channels independent of sympathetic activity.
monocytogenes and endogeneous microflora in caviar held at 3 C and 7 C over a month of storage.
The regulation of endogeneous energy stores during starvation and refeeding in the somatic tissues of the golden perch.
(1980) A novel purification procedure for Penicillium notatum phospholipase B and evidence for a modification of phospholipase B activity by the action of an endogeneous protease.
Endogeneous estrogen testosterone and progesterone levels in
* Endocannabinoids--the endogenous arachidonate-based lipids, which serve as physiological endogeneous ligands for the cannabinoid receptors: All endocannabinoids are eicosanoids.
Problems with instrumental variables estimation when the correlation between the instruments and the endogeneous explanatory variable is weak.
In line with the endogeneous Ubx pattern, Ubx-YFP is restricted to peripodial membrane nuclei in the T2 wing imaginal disc (data not shown).
He then examines glosses and glossing practice, the work of doing a change of plans, the endogeneous production of order in science lessons, living in the midst of the thickets of ethnomethodology in science education, knowledge and institutional power, the actor's (teacher's) point of view, planning and enacting a living science curriculum, and whether or not there is more for science education.