endosome

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endosome

[′en·də‚sōm]
(cell and molecular biology)
A mass of chromatin near the center of a vesicular nucleus.
(invertebrate zoology)
The inner layer of certain sponges.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mutant SOD1 directly interferes with snapin, an essential molecule that adheres endosomes to dynein motor proteins.
MVBs are formed from early endosomes, which as prelysosomal structures belong to the degradative endosomal pathway of internalized proteins.
The megalin/cubilin receptor binds albumin, which is subsequently internalized by clathrin-coated pits into endosomes that are acidified by NHE3 and v-[H.
Newly formed vesicles lose the clathrin coat and fuse with endosomes (21).
However, he says, the new findings suggest that in a dividing cell, endosomes with small asbestos fibers would continue to scoot along the tubule roadway, but away from the region of the dividing chromosomes.
Rather than remaining in the Golgi, GPP130 constantly cycles to the endosomes and back to the Golgi.
These endosomes fuse with other naturally-occurring organelles termed lysosomes, which contain enzymes that serve as the digestive system of the cell.
Professor Joseph Irudayaraj and graduate student Jiji Chen, both in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, have found that the nanoprobes, or nanorods, when coated with the breast cancer drug Herceptin, are reaching the endosomes of cells, mimicking the delivery of the drug on its own.
The fluorescence intensity (QDs) of cells gradually decreased and was highly concentrated in endosomes, suggesting intracellular degradation of QDs.
The albumin is taken up into endosomes of the proximal tubular cells.
Ted Hackstadt (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT) reported that, unlike the majority of most intracellular parasites, which block maturation of endosomes to lysosomes at discrete stages and then replicate within those vacuoles, chlamydiae appear to dissociate themselves from the endocytic pathway shortly after internalization by actively modifying the vacuole to become fusogenic with sphingomyelin-containing exocytic vesicles.