endospore

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Related to Endospores: sporulation, Prions

endospore

[′en·də‚spȯr]
(biology)
An asexual spore formed within a cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
Multiple methods exist for the diagnosis of coccidioidal infection, including microscopic detection of endospore containing spherules within tissue or fluid samples, molecular detection using nucleic acid amplification with polymerase chain reaction, cultures on fungal or bacterial media, and serologic testing.
The novelty of this outbreak is the mode of transmission with endospores injected (in most cases) directly into the blood supply, resulting in novel soft tissue manifestations and severe systemic manifestations.
It forms a unique type of resting cell called an endospore that remains dormant until the environment becomes favorable.
Standard microbiological protocols were performed without modification (Leboffe and Pierce, 2010): Simple stain, negative stain, Gram stain, endospore stain, capsule stain (Hiss Method), wet mount, aerotolerance, inoculation on eosin-methylene blue agar, catalase activity, oxidase activity (BBL DrySlide, Becton Dickinson Co.
The Bacillus species are appealing probiotic candidates because of the ability of members within this genus to form endospores that are resistant to environmental variation and processing of food (Flint and Garner, 2009), and have the ability to secret digestive enzymes (Chen et al.
In discussing bacterial endospores as unique microbial structures, the example of Clostridium botulinum was used.
are able to form endospores that allow them to survive for extended periods under adverse environmental conditions.
It effectively eliminates vegetative bacteria cells, enveloped viruses and fungi, but has a limited effect on Mycobacteria, non-enveloped viruses and bacterial endospores.
However, unlike bacterial endospores these cysts cannot withstand extreme temperatures.
Heat-treated homogenates were serially diluted and 2-[micro]L aliquots of each dilution were spot-plated onto NA to estimate the number of in vivo produced endospores.
The CDC defines sterilization as a "process that destroys, eliminates or inactivates (kills) all forms of microbial life including bacterial endospores.
In preliminary studies it was found that the rich media and slow growth (2-3 days) of mycoplasmas tended to allow the endospores of Bacillus species present in the plant material to germinate and overgrow.