endosymbiosis

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endosymbiosis

[‚en·dō‚sim·bē′ō·səs]
(ecology)
A mutually beneficial relationship in which one organism lives inside the other.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the identification of Coxiella cheraxi in crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) (21) and other Coxiella-like endosymbionts suggests that there is far more genetic diversity within the genus than previously perceived.
Differential specificity between closely related corals and abundant Endozoicomonas endosymbionts across global scales.
Our results confirmed the presence of multiple/diverse endosymbionts in whitefly samples collected from Punjab, Pakistan.
Primarily, insect endosymbionts can be grouped into primary and secondary endosymbionts (Werren, 1997).
Algae also exist as endosymbionts in various plants and protozoa.
Reef-building corals experience high daily variation in their environment, food availability, and physiological activities such as calcification and photosynthesis by endosymbionts.
Wolbachia endosymbionts are gram-negative, maternally inherited intracellular alpha-proteobacteria, known to infect a wide range of invertebrates which include insects, mites, isopods, crustaceans and filarial nematodes (1).
The complete elimination of endosymbionts using antibiotics reduces the lifespan of the insect and suppresses the population within a few days or weeks [3].
It should be noted that organisms with genomes sequestered within germ cells are generally less amenable to lateral transfer (68) so ubiquitous in bacteria and archaea (69), except when dealing with the genomic contributions of endosymbionts (70).
The impact of endosymbionts on the evolution of host sex-determination mechanisms.
Recent developments in molecular genetics have led to revisions of classical knowledge about the interaction between parasites and vectors, and have provided insight into the intricate regulation of them, notably the role of immune responses as well as endosymbionts.
Bacterial endosymbionts of the genus Wolbachia have been identified repeatedly from bed bugs (Hypsa and Aksoy, 1997; Rasgon and Scott, 2004: Sakamoto and Rasgon, 2006; Sakamoto et al.