Endozoochory

Endozoochory

 

the dissemination of fruits or seeds in the alimentary canal of an animal, for example, bird, rodent, or ungulate. Many fruits and seeds are especially brightly colored (Paris quadrifolia, lily of the valley, snowberry) or fragrant (strawberry, raspberry) to attract animals. As the seeds pass through the alimentary canal, their germinating power is frequently increased because of the action of acids and mechanical injury to the seed coats.

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To really understand the importance of endozoochory on seed germination, it is necessary to use multiple animals, each fed seeds from multiple parents.
Most studies concerning frugivory and endozoochory center on avian and mammalian systems (Braun and Brooks, 1987) partly because they are viewed as the most important dispersers of seeds of modern gymnosperms and angiosperms (Fleming and Lips, 1991); however, reptiles also can play an important selective force in evolution of angiosperms (Tiffney, 1986).
Ecological correlates of endozoochory by herbivores.
Two groups of seeds stood out with regard to their tentative potential to withstand anaerobic digestion; those with a water-impermeable seed coat and those adapted to dispersal via endozoochory.
In analogy with selection of specific seed traits that accommodate dispersal by ants, birds or wind, Janzen (1984) proposed that grazers could exert a selective force to accommodate endozoochory by herbivorous mammals, such that seeds would become more resistant to anaerobic digestion.
Attempts were made to correlate seed survival to certain seed characteristics, such as seed size, weight, and shape (ecological correlates); if successful, dispersal distance and spatial distribution patterns of species due to endozoochory could be simulated (e.
This raises the possibility of endozoochory, although simple predation and destruction of seeds appears more likely from fragments of seeds observed.