ampere-hour

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ampere-hour

[′am‚pir ¦au̇·ər]
(electricity)
A unit for the quantity of electricity, obtained by integrating current flow in amperes over the time in hours for its flow; used as a measure of battery capacity. Abbreviated Ah; amp-hr.

ampere-hour

A current flow for one hour measured in amperes (amps). Abbreviated "Ah" and commonly called "amp-hour," it is widely used to rate how long it takes for a battery to discharge. For smaller batteries, a milliampere-hour (mAh) rating is used. For example, a 500 mAh battery means it will release 500 milliamps of current at a specific voltage for one hour before it is discharged. See ampere.


Amp-Hours and Watt-Hours
Batteries can be rated in amp-hours (Ah) or watt-hours (Wh) as shown in these examples for a digital camera. The bottom battery is equivalent to 3.3 Wh, while the top battery is equivalent to 667 mAh.
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