energy harvesting

(redirected from Energy scavenging)

energy harvesting

Deriving small amounts of energy from the environment for low-power devices. Motion, body heat, solar rays and electromagnetic radiation are examples of sources of energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company develops and commercializes a revolutionary technology that combines energy scavenging systems with ultra low power consumption radio technology.
Energy Scavenging and Non-traditional Power Sources for Wireless Sensor Networks (Shad Roundy and Luc Frechette).
Additional presentations and discussions on the topic of integrated power sources focused on energy scavenging as a means of recharging the power source, a technique enabled by the unique characteristics of thin-film batteries manufactured by Cymbet Corporation.
Enertia, an energy scavenging technology that supplies life-cycle power for autonomous, self-sustaining wireless sensors, received the Runner-up award for Best Business and the second Outstanding Presentation Award
Energy harvesting, otherwise known as power harvesting or energy scavenging includes photovoltaics, thermovoltaics, piezoelectrics and electrodynamics, among other options, which are now being used in a wide variety of applications.
Ion Power Group's technology should not be confused with energy scavenging devices that harvest man-made power from radio waves or AC power lines.
It is alternatively referred to as energy scavenging and power harvesting.
Through energy scavenging, we could potentially power cameras, microphones and other sensors and communications equipment that an insect could carry aboard a tiny backpack," Najafi said.
Energy scavenging isn't new, of course: Windmills, waterwheels and solar panels all capture power from the environment.
To diversify those potential power sources, CERDEC has developed what Slane calls a "solar solution to energy scavenging.
In this text for graduate students, researchers, and developers in computer science, electrical engineering, and telecommunications, contributors from industry and academia cover topics including sensor training and security; embedded operating systems; signal processing and medium access; target location, tracking, and sensor localization; broadcasting, routing, and sensor area coverage; topology construction and maintenance; and energy scavenging and power sources.
Full browser ?