energy spectrum

(redirected from Energy spectra)

energy spectrum

[′en·ər·jē ‚spek·trəm]
(physics)
Any plot, display, or photographic record of the intensity of some type of radiation as a function of its energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The nonuniqueness of the two single-wavenumber representations of the nonlinear energy in the MMT model results in the different appearances of energy spectra and energy budgets, which stem mainly from the nonlocal interactions among modes.
As is the case with the energy spectra, we define three energy transfers: the linear-energy transfer, [T.
About Spectra Energy Spectra Energy Corp (NYSE: SE), a FORTUNE 500 company, is one of North America's premier pipeline and midstream companies.
The design and construction of the proposed new simulated NORM sample and the subsequent energy spectra characterization measurements are presented as part of this work.
For this purpose, multiple energy spectra measurements were performed using [.
The energy spectra for a large number of NORM samples were measured, including: slate, cat litter, ice melt, roofing tiles, hay, coal, fertilizer, Australian zircon sand, diammonium phosphate (DAP), ISG Pye, CEMEX type FC, monocalcium phosphate (biofos), allanite, monazite, pyrochlore and zircon.
The background subtracted energy spectra acquired for the different NORM samples tested are shown in Figs.
Due to the fact that energy spectra of neutrons[4] are influenced by such characteristics as geometric latitude and altitude coordinates as well as the structure (shield effect) of buildings, measurements of soft error rates vary by location.
Measurement of neutron energy spectra at actual-use sites
The rate of soft errors depends on the energy spectra of neutrons in the atmosphere.
To look for signs of dark energy, the Cambridge astronomers and their colleagues examined the brightness and energy spectra of X-ray emissions from 26 clusters to calculate the exact distances to the clusters, known to lie between 1 billion and 8 billion light-years from Earth.
The mission's scientific objectives require a high-energy gamma-ray telescope with angular resolution sufficient to identify point sources with objects at other wavelengths, a wide field-of-view that will permit the study of sources that exhibit extreme intensity variations on timescales from seconds to months or longer, and a large effective area to detect a large sample of sources and determine their energy spectra.

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