protein engineering

(redirected from Engineering proteins)
Also found in: Medical.

protein engineering

[′prō‚tēn ‚en·jə′nir·iŋ]
(cell and molecular biology)
The design and construction of new proteins or enzymes with novel or desired functions by modifying amino acid sequences by using recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Our method of genetically engineering proteins to optimize their uptake and processing by antigen presenting cells is the same approach we have used in the development of Provenge(TM), our therapeutic prostate cancer vaccine that recently produced promising results in a Phase III clinical trial.
among the first companies to use X-ray crystallography and molecular modeling for genetically engineering proteins.
This patent covers methods for engineering proteins that bind to any predetermined DNA sequence, expanding the protein structures claimed in a related patent issued to PEC in 1992.
0's machine learning optimization technologies, such as ProteinGPS(TM) and GeneGPS(TM), is drastically speeding up the process of engineering proteins in the Pareto pipeline.
Verdezyne employs its biological expertise and proprietary advanced computational algorithms to design and synthesize novel gene libraries for engineering proteins, metabolic pathways, and microorganisms as well as to manufacture platform chemicals and biofuels.
The DeNovo Genes technology is uniquely suited to engineering proteins for commercial applications such as industrial biocatalysis and healthcare products including therapeutic proteins and diagnostic reagents.
Verdezyne employs its biology expertise and proprietary advanced computational algorithms to design and synthesize novel, high-diversity gene libraries for engineering proteins, metabolic pathways and microorganisms.
The DeNovo Genes(TM) technology is uniquely suited to engineering proteins for commercial applications such as industrial biocatalysis and healthcare products such as therapeutic proteins and diagnostic reagents.

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