Exeter

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Exeter

(ĕk`sətər), city (1991 pop. 88,235) and district, Devon, SW England, on the Exe River. It is the market, transportation, administrative, and distribution center for SW England. Manufacturing predominates, with metal and leather goods, paper, and farm implements as Exeter's chief products. The fort town Isca Dumnoniorum occupied the site in Roman times. Because of its strategic location, Exeter was besieged by the Danes in the 9th and 11th cent., by William the Conqueror in 1068, by Yorkists in the 15th cent., and by religious factions in the middle of the 16th cent. From the 10th to the 18th cent. the city was an important center for the production and exportation of woolen goods. The cathedral, with its massive Norman towers, is a classic example of Decorated styleDecorated style,
name applied to the second period of English Gothic architecture from the late 13th to the mid-14th cent. The basic structural elements developed during the Early English style (late 12th and 13th cent.) were retained, but their decoration became more elaborate.
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 architecture. In the cathedral library is the famous Exeter BookExeter Book,
manuscript volume of Old English religious and secular poetry, of various dates of composition, compiled c.975 and given to Exeter Cathedral by Bishop Leofric (d. 1072). Bibliography

See edition by G. P. Krapp and E. V. K. Dobbie (1936).
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. Ruins still remain of the Roman walls and of Rougemont Castle (11th cent.), built under William the Conqueror.

Exeter

 

a city and borough in southwestern England. Port on the River Exe. Seat of Devon County. Population, 93,300 (1976). Exeter has enterprises of the machine-building and food-processing industries. The city has a university.

Exeter is located on the site of a Celtic settlement. Traces of regular Roman street layout remain; however, the historical part of the city, located within the standing portions of a wall dating to the Middle Ages, presents a picture of unplanned growth. Structures of architectural interest include the ruins of the late Romanesque castle on Rougemont Hill (begun 1068), a 12th-century guildhall combining the Romanesque and Gothic styles (rebuilt 14th and 16th centuries), and a Gothic cathedral in the decorated style (originally a Romanesque church; rebuilt 1275–1375). The Royal Albert Memorial Museum, with archaeological collections of pottery and bronzes, is located in Exeter.

REFERENCE

Sharp, T. Exeter Phoenix. London, 1946.

Exeter

a city in SW England, administrative centre of Devon; university (1955). Pop.: 106 772 (2001)