Position

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position

1. Music
a. the vertical spacing or layout of the written notes in a chord. Chords arranged with the three upper voices close together are in close position. Chords whose notes are evenly or widely distributed are in open position
b. one of the points on the fingerboard of a stringed instrument, determining where a string is to be stopped
2. in classical prosody
a. the situation in which a short vowel may be regarded as long, that is, when it occurs before two or more consonants
b. make position (of a consonant, either on its own or in combination with other consonants, such as x in Latin) to cause a short vowel to become metrically long when placed after it
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Position

 

any one of several basic positions of the legs and arms in classical dance. The positions determine the harmonious arrangement of the body in space, assure the proper execution of the dance step, and create the gracefulness and expressiveness of the dance.

There are five positions of the feet. In the first, the feet, with heels touching, have the toes turned outward, forming a straight line on the floor. In the second, the heels of the turned-out legs are placed the length of a foot apart. In the third, the feet partially adjoin one another. In the fourth, the turned-out feet are parallel to each other and separated by a distance of one foot. In the fifth, the feet are closed with the heel of one foot touching the toe of the other.

There are three positions of the arms. In the first, the rounded arms are raised to the level of the diaphragm; in the second, they are extended to either side at shoulder level; and in the third, they are raised over the head. Numerous other positions are formed from the basic one.


Position

 

(1) The placing or location of something; sometimes a point of departure or a starting point, for example, the position of troops or the position of opponents in a chess game.

(2) A point of view on a question; a definite appraisal of a fact, phenomenon, or event; actions or behavior instigated by this attitude or appraisal, for example, a position in an argument or a temporizing position.


Position

 

a zone, or sector, of the terrain that troops are occupying or are preparing to occupy.

Positions are, as a rule, set up by the engineers and form an integral part of deeply echeloned defense zones, in which they are distributed in a definite order along the front and in depth. The main element of every position is usually the defense areas or strongpoints of the defending elements connected by a unified system of fire and obstacles. Each position is equipped with foxholes, bunkers, covers, and if there is time, fire trenches that can be linked by communication trenches. This provides concealment of the disposition of the men and the means of fire at the position, protection from enemy fire, and better opportunities for maneuvering along the front and in depth. Troops also prepare firing positions for machine guns, artillery, mortars, antitank guided missiles, tanks, self-propelled gunmounts, and other means of fire, as well as launching positions for the rocket forces. Intermediate and switch positions may be organized in the depth of the defense. They prevent the advance of the enemy and usually serve as lines of deployment for reserves before they mount a counterattack.

To mislead the enemy concerning the actual location of the main line of resistance, a forward position may be created on several of the most important axes. Moreover, dummy positions may be set up in the depth of the defense, as well as reserve and temporary positions for the maneuver of elements and means of fire in combat. If there is no forward position, a combat security position is created to protect the first position of the main defense zone from surprise enemy attack and to hinder enemy reconnaissance. In preparing for an offensive, attack and assembly positions are organized in the area of departure for elements of motorized rifle and tank troops, as well as launching positions for the rocket troops and firing positions for artillery, mortars, and other means of fire. During an offensive, the troops occupy and organize positions to consolidate the captured terrain.

Units and ships of the navy also take up attack positions prior to combat. Mine-artillery positions may be organized in coastal regions.


Position

 

in music the placement of the left hand on the finger board of a stringed instrument so that a given sequence of notes can be produced without moving the hand.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

position

[pə′zish·ən]
(navigation)
A point defined by stated or implied coordinates, usually on the surface of the earth.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The novelty value of being a Scot in such a lofty English position now bores Gorman to distraction.
Since English wine is hardly a factor in international winetrade, one must assume that the English position is based on political principles, not the selfish desire to sell English Elderberry Sparkling Wine at the expense of the French.
But chair of the BMA's Welsh consultants committee Dr Sharon Blackford said: "The position regarding employed doctors' salaries in Wales is unclear - indeed, the Welsh Government seems to have merely taken the English position and muddied the water.
The issue will come under scrutiny once again in a fortnight when England and Wales Cricket Board chairman David Morgan explains the English position at the International Cricket Council executive board meeting in Auckland.
I was told by a current faculty member at Wesley that Leslie Pitts, who worked in the computer center and has subsequently left Wesley, had said that he had seen an e-mail from the president, which directed the English Department when they were advertising for an English position not to advertise it in such a way that it would suit me.