Eniwetok


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Eniwetok,

Marshall Islands: see EnewetakEnewetak,
 Enewetok,
or Eniwetok
, circular atoll, central Pacific, one of the Ralik Chain in the Marshall Islands. Enewetak is c.50 mi (80 km) in circumference and comprises about 40 islets surrounding a large lagoon.
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Eniwetok

an atoll in the W Pacific Ocean, in the NW Marshall Islands: taken by the US from Japan in 1944; became a naval base and later a testing ground for atomic weapons. Pop.: 715 (latest est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
(65.) United States Fleet, Headquarters of the Commander-in-Chief, Supporting Operations for the Occupation of the Marshall Islands including the Westernmost Atoll, Eniwetok, February 1944, Battle Experience Bulletin No.
MARSHALL ISLANDS: Eniwetok [11[degrees]21'N, 162[degrees]14'E]: 4 [male], 1 [female], Eniwetok Island [11[degrees]20'N, 162[degrees]19'E], under rocks, 1 August 1969, J.W.
13 February to 20 February 1945: Anchored off Eniwetok Atoll for 7 days.
Kopara (AG5O), and was always talking about the islands of Eniwetok, Kwajelein, and others I've forgotten, in the South Pacific.
Odum y Odum (1955) demostraron sobre la base de biomasa, que en la terraza de Barlovento en el arrecife coralino (atolon) de Eniwetok, las algas eran el componente dominante.
19, 1944, by a mortar shell during the American invasion of Eniwetok in the Marshall Islands.
Darwin's theory, proposed in 1842, was finally proven true a century later, when experimental drilling in the lagoon of Eniwetok atoll, specifically designed to test this theory, hit basaltic rock of volcanic origin at a depth of 4,593 ft (1,400 m) below a cover of fossil coral reef.
On 9 April 1948, Agent Komori was attached to a special task force to provide security for Eniwetok Atoll, site of atomic weapons testing.
Silver-108m in biota and sediments at Bikini and Eniwetok Atolls.
York Times science reporter William Laurence (described by Boyer as "the Manhattan Project's official reporter--and unofficial public relations mouthpiece") to deny the stories of radiation sickness in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, already reported firsthand by the Australian journalist Wilfred Burchett, as nothing but "Jap propaganda." Boyer notes that "the official effort to discredit Burchett's Hiroshima report in fact prefigured a pattern that would continue through the Bikini tests of 1946, the Eniwetok tests of 1954, a whole series of tests in the American Southwest, and decades of blandly optimistic civil-defense pronouncements."
November: The United States expodes the first hydrogen bomb at Eniwetok Atoll in the Pacific.
Army's 35th Infantry Regiment killed 558 of their enemies and took 17 prisoners in the course of capturing the heights known as the "Sea Horse." On Eniwetok in February 1944, 23 prisoners were taken out of a total Japanese garrison of about 800.