Enkidu


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Enkidu

hirsute companion of Gilgamesh. [Babyl. Myth.: Gilgamesh]
See: Hair
References in periodicals archive ?
He is rather the first to break the rules, although the narrative is precisely about his learning to respect boundaries, just as Enkidu had to learn to be human.
1], Gilgamesh describes to Enkidu an ominous dream that he has before the two attack Huwawa.
The same word is used of both Enkidu and Gilgamesh in an obscure passage, Tablet VIII line 18, for which Dietz Edzard ingeniously suggested an erotic wordplay ("Kleine Beitrage zum Gilgames-Epos," Orientalia NS 54 [1985]: 53-54), but this was rejected by Andrew George, The Babylonian Gilgamesh Epic [Oxford Univ.
For Enkidu to be seen intradiegetically gives him greater authenticity, as it were.
Samhat then persuades Enkidu to go to Uruk to seek out Gilgames, continuing the process of his civilization by clothing him and then leading him to the shepherds' camp where he learns to consume bread and ale (Gilg.
The authors tend to make much of what they see as loose ends in the story, for example, that Shamhat's "proposal to Enkidu to Uruk is not actually realized in the OB epic" (p.
It is quite clear that neither Gilgames nor Enkidu can be characterized as "homosexuals" because of their mutual relationship, or "bisexuals" because they have relations with both sexes.
In his own excellent new study The Buried Book: The Loss and Rediscovery of the Great Epic of Gilgamesh (Henry Holt, 2007), David Damrosch follows many others in calling Gilgamesh "the first great masterpiece of world literature," and its protagonist, literature's "first great hero": a two-thirds divine, indefatigable, oversexed, tyrannical ruler who, horrified by the death of his bosom friend and fellow-adventurer Enkidu (with whom he slew the monster Humbaba and, later, the bull of heaven), journeys to the edge of the world in a quest of immortality that the gods have already doomed.
The heroes Gilgamesh and Enkidu are caught between their part-divine and part-human natures, between the forces of nature and those of civilization, and between the erotic pull of male and female partners.
Keetman, "Konig Gilgames reitet auf seinen Untertanen: Gilgames, Enkidu und die Unterwelt politisch gesehen," BiOr 64 (2007): 6-31.
By titling the piece "Adam and Steve" I did not mean to imply that the relationship between Gilgamesh and Enkidu could be mistaken for that of a contemporary gay couple
It's true that there is no comparably explicit description of sex between Gilgamesh and Enkidu, at least in the main body of the epic--though Mitchell claims that a separate book, Tablet XII, an older myth that he excludes from this version, does include genital contact.