Enlil


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Enlil

(ĕnlĭl`), ancient earth god of Sumerian origin, worshiped in Babylonian religion. With the sky god Anu and the water god Ea, he formed the great divine triad. Enlil, also referred to as Bel, could be hostile or beneficent. He was responsible for the order and harmony in the universe, but as a god of storms and winds he brought terrible destruction.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Enlil

 

in Babylonian-Assyrian religion and mythology, one of the three supreme deities, the others being Anu and Ea. Enlil was the personification of natural forces. According to the myths, he separated the sky from the earth, invented farming implements, created the gods of livestock raising and land cultivation, and introduced people to culture. As the god of the elements, Enlil was also believed to be the cause of natural disasters.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Enlil

ordered wholesale destruction of humanity by flood. [Babylonian Myth.: Gilgamesh]

Enlil

storm god responsible for deluge. [Babyl. Myth.: Parrinder, 91]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
And yet, knowledge of Anzu's theft of the tablet of destinies from Enlil helps us appreciate why the situation in Enuma elis is so different.
One of the guards is accused of abusing a woman; the man escapes to serve the Army of Enlil. The women are warned that war is imminent.
The Enlil model, in addition to giving us a psychedelic look at interstellar weather, also serves another crucial purpose.
Here he examines the second half of the weather section of the Assyro-Babylonian omen series Enuma Anu Enlil. Tablets 44-46 record thunder omens, he says, 47 treats lightning, rainbows, and earthquakes; and 48 refers to rain, fog, and mud.
Os babilonios concebiam a terra como uma "montanha de muitas terras", projetando-se contra o ceu, sobre cujo pico o maior deus do ceu, Enlil, sentava-se entronizado.