Ennius


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Ennius

Quintus . 239--169 bc, Roman epic poet and dramatist
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One hoped that Zakaria would have learned from another great teacher, Cicero, who quoted Quintus Ennius [the father of Roman poetry] in one of his more important speeches, saying: "People hate the man they fear -- and whomever they hate, they want to see dead".
The Annals of Quintus Ennius and the Italic Tradition.
Around 200 BC Ennius tells us simply that "the Poeni sacrificed their children to the gods" (221 V; Skutsch 1953).
A hundred years later another Greek, Quintus Ennius (239-169) poet and dramaturgist considered as the "father of Latin literature" introduced in program of these schools classical Latin writers.
The reference to Virgil in line 55 of the Ars pertains to the introduction of neologisms into the Latin language and the biased preference which is often given to writers of the past, such as Cato and Ennius.
Somnium 10 hic mihi (credo equidem ex hoc quod eramus locuti; fit enim fere, ut cogitationes sermonesque nostri pariant aliquid in somno tale, quale de Homero scribit Ennius, de quo videlicet saepissime vigilans solebat cogitare et loqui) Africanus se ostendit
In another case, an unknown accuser charged Lucius Ennius, a Roman Knight, with maiestas upon information that Ennius melted down a statue of Tiberius and had it formed into a silver plate.
2) But as Romulus had founded Rome augusto augurio according to Ennius, so the name 'Augustus' streamlined the connection with the conditor urbis to his venerable aspect only.
The anecdote ends in a satirical mode: the grammarian who had criticised the word praeterpropter as plebeian and uncultivated is put in his place by Fronto with a clever quotation from Ennius, and leaves blushing and sweating while everyone laughs at him.
I) or endo suam do in Ennius (via Ausonius Technop.
We learn that Horace mentions the Pythagorean dreams of Ennius, who thought that his soul had once inhabited the body of Homer and earlier that of a peacock.
Homer, Ennius, Hesiod, and Lucan sit there as representatives of ancient poetry; but their British counterparts are far more lavishly depicted.