Enobarbus

Enobarbus

kills himself for deserting Antony. [Br. Lit.: Antony and Cleopatra]
See: Suicide
References in periodicals archive ?
I am reminded of the characters of Enobarbus and Eros in Shakespeare's most poetic play Antony and Cleopatra.
For instance, Enobarbus's famous, rhapsodic recollection of Cleopatra's perfumed passage down the river Cydnus modifies Plutarch in ways that telegraph how he has been changed by what he has witnessed.
Iras says, "He's unqualified with very shame"--"drained," according to the Oxford editor, "of all his essential and distinguishing characteristics." Enobarbus comments about his master's diminishing rational faculties.
175-183), followed by Enobarbus's famous description of Cleopatra's first meeting with Antony (A&C II.ii.
| Dies of shame: Enobarbus in Antony and Cleopatra Domitius Enobarbus is a Roman soldier and politician, and in the play is lieutenant to Antony - he speaks one of the most famous lines in the play when he describes how "age cannot wither" Cleopatra.
Chapter four, "Reading Like a Mermaid: Antony and Cleopatra's (Un)Mysterious History and the Case of the Disappearing Snake," uses the mermaid figures pulling Cleopatra's barge in Enobarbus's famous act two description of her arrival as the basis for a challenge of certainties in this play.
In this verbal maneuver, Muiris resembles Shakespeare's Enobarbus in Antony and Cleopatra when he recounts Antony's first sighting of Cleopatra on the Nile.
For Shakespeare's Cleopatra, this revisioning project begins with her spectacular entrance in her barge of state, which is reported by Enobarbus in a staged act of storytelling.
For example, in the original Antony's high ranking officer, Domitius Enobarbus, says that "the oars were silver, / Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke, and made / The water which they beat to follow faster, / As amorous of their strokes" (Antony and Cleopatra 2.2.201-04).
Similarly, Enobarbus describes Cleopatra's artifice when he talks of her as of a woman who uses her 'sighs and tears' (I.2.144) in order to dupe Antony.
Phil Daniels shows he's left Albert Square far behind, as a perfectly pitched Enobarbus, raising many of the laughs.
thy pall'd fortunes more" Enobarbus: "Caesar., thou hast