Enola Gay


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Enola Gay

B-52 that dropped the Hiroshima A-bomb. [U.S. Hist.: WB, W:405]
References in periodicals archive ?
The third possibility, as has been claimed in recent years by several former technicians at a major electrical power station in Kokura, is that the haze was an intentional release of steam, created as a matter of routine when the first B-29, the Enola Gay, was spotted.
Tibbets' Flight Suit, worn on the Enola Gay, when he dropped the world's first atom bomb used in warfare on Hiroshima (August 6, 1945).
If Dante had been on the plane with us, he would have been terrified," Enola Gay pilot Paul Tibbet was quoted as saying after the Hiroshima blast, as he referred to medieval Italian poet Dante Alighieri and his allegoric hell, Inferno.
The book steadily progresses from the New Mexico desert, to the USS Indianapolis, which transported the bomb, to Tinian Island, where the Enola Gay awaited.
His accomplishments allowed America to advance its technology in both civilian and military applications; ethyl gasoline enabled carrier-based Army aircraft, and fueled the Enola Gay when it dropped the atomic bomb that ended World War II.
Dropped from a B29 named Enola Gay, the bomb devastated the city with the power of 12,500 tons of dynamite.
To the sound of Enola Gay blaring from loud speakers, dozens of Teesside and County Durham students were joined by others from as far away as Liverpool and Manchester to look at all aspects of a military career.
The kind of thinking that Heinold abhors was also in Jimmy Doolittle's mind over Japan, and in the minds of the pilots over Dresden, and in the minds of the Los Alamos scientists and crew of the Enola Gay.
The colonel in command of the fateful B-29 bomber that would deploy "Little Boy" quaintly christened his aircraft the Enola Gay after his mother back home in Iowa.
An example is the B-29 Enola Gay, which dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima on 6 August 1945.
Udvax-Hazy Center at Dulles Airport on December 15 to protest the display of the Enola Gay, the plane that dropped the first atomic bomb.
The display of the Enola Gay at the Smithsonian's new branch of the National Air and Space Museum outside Washington, D.