Entelechy

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Entelechy

 

one of the central concepts of Aristotelian philosophy, expressing the unity of the four causes, or fundamental principles, of existence—matter, form, efficient cause, and final cause.

The various definitions of entelechy encountered in Aristotle may be reduced to the transition from potentiality, or possibility, to the organized manifestation of energy—such energy containing within itself its own material substance, its own cause, and the end of its own motion, or development. In modern times the concept has been used by G. von Leibniz, who used the term “entelechy” to designate his monads. Entelechy was given a particular interpretation in the vitalism of the German biologist H. Driesch.

References in periodicals archive ?
This is so despite its being an entelecheia, having its own end within itself.
If the principle of nature has its end outside of itself and in another, then the soul's nature is incomplete; but if the soul is an entelecheia it should come to light as something that by its nature is complete.
57) Fire is limited by something external to it, while the soul has its limit within itself, is self-contained, and is thus an entelecheia.
The success of Aristotle's definition of soul as entelecheia already seems to entail the singling out of a certain kind of soul--a thinking soul--as psuche in the precise sense.
75) The soul is coming to light as an incomplete actuality, something which in its precise sense may amount to the same thing as an entelecheia.
79) Yet that analysis falls short of explaining how soul could be a final cause, not dependent on something else for its completion, or even, for that matter, an entelecheia, that kind of actualization Aristotle has told us the soul in fact is.