Enterobacteriaceae


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Enterobacteriaceae

[‚ent·ə·rō‚bak·tir·ē′ās·ē‚ē]
(microbiology)
A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rods; cells are nonsporeforming and may be nonmotile or motile with peritrichous flagella; includes important human and plant pathogens.
References in periodicals archive ?
Review of laboratory records showed that no carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae had been detected prior to 12 May 2012.
However, in the past 5 years, other carbapenemases that are also rapidly spread by mobile genetic elements harboring genes encoding carbapenemases, such as metallo[beta]-lactamases (MBLs), including New Delhi MBLs, Verona integron-encoded MBLs, and IMPs (active on imipenem), as well as Class D OXA-producing enzymes (such as OXA-48), have also been reported in clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates from the United States (8,24).
In this study we have found both fosfomycin and mecillinam to have a high in-vitro activity against a range of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, especially against E.
Direct comparison of the BD Phoenix system with the MicroScan Walkaway system for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermentative gram-negative organisms.
A total of 239 consecutive, non-repetitive, clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from various clinical samples such as exudates (95), urine (71), sputum (54), blood (15) and vaginal swab (4) obtained between July 2009 and November 2009 were included in the study.
The emergence of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae is therefore of great concern, as therapeutic options for this group are very limited.
Conventional culture and speciation techniques tell us that the organisms typically associated with CSOM are Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterobacteriaceae spp.
Musgrove looked for a family of bacteria called Enterobacteriaceae, which includes Salmonella, Escherichia, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, and Yersinia.
Kidd, Rossignol, & Gamroth, in the May issue of the Journal, uncovered yet another thread in this lace of scientific advance, agricultural dependence, and consumer preference when they documented the presence of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in commodity feed used on several dairy farms in Oregon.
The rate of endotoxemia with Enterobacteriaceae is low (eg, as low as 41% and 46% for Escherichia coli and Enterobacter species, respectively) versus the rate with non-Enterobacteriaceae (eg, 63% and 74% for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Neisseria meningitidis, respectively).
This report provides information on the therapeutic development for Enterobacteriaceae Infections, complete with latest updates, and special features on late-stage and discontinued projects.