passive smoking

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Related to Environmental Tobacco Smoke: passive smoking, Second hand smoking

passive smoking

the inhalation of smoke from other people's cigarettes by a nonsmoker
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Cardiovascular Diseases
Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke is an important and preventable risk factor for respiratory tract diseases in children.
Conclusion: Environmental tobacco smoke was found to be associated with dental caries.
Also, tests on the urine of children who moved into the smokers' homes showed exposure to environmental tobacco smoke pollutants, indicating that house dust and surfaces, such as toys, can be an important route of exposure for infants and children.
Lee Statistics and Computing Ltd., United Kingdom) examine the role of environmental tobacco smoke exposure in asthma induction and exacerbation in children and adults, and consider whether views on the role of second-hand smoke in asthma that have been expressed by various health authorities are justified.
Although the room is closed to the public, it is frequented by members of Congress, journalists, and Congressional staff--all whom have been exposed to environmental tobacco smoke for years.
The self-reported workplace exposure to environmental tobacco smoke was more than 40 hours per week pre-ban, but dropped to about 25 minutes post-ban, with a 99% decrease in exposure.
BAAF has just updated its recommendations on this topic in Practice Note 51, Reducing the Risks of Environmental Tobacco Smoke for Looked After Children and their Carers.
A study conducted by the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center shows that exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, even at extremely low levels, is associated with behavior problems in children and preteens.
Some, such as pyridine and butadiene, are designed to measure exposure to "environmental tobacco smoke", while others check for the effects of vehicle exhaust fumes.
In the 1988-1994 survey of 2,273 adolescents aged 12-19 years, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and active smoking were independently tied to nearly fivefold and more than sixfold higher odds of developing metabolic syndrome, respectively, after adjusting for gender, age, race or ethnicity, poverty status, region, and parental history of diabetes or heart attack.
In the 1988-1994 survey of 2,273 adolescents aged 12-19 years, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and active smoking were independently associated with nearly fivefold and more than sixfold higher odds of developing the metabolic syndrome, respectively, after adjustment for gender, age, race or ethnicity, poverty status, region, and parental history of diabetes or heart attack.

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