geographical determinism

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geographical determinism

any analytical viewpoint that suggests that different patterns of human culture and social organization are determined by geographical factors such as climate, terrain, etc. The view has a long ancestry stretching back to the ancient Greeks. However, although many social theorists, e.g. MONTESQUIEU, have placed a strong emphasis on the importance of geography most see it as one factor influencing social arrangements, not usually a predetermining one. Compare CULTURAL MATERIALISM, WITTFOGEL.
References in periodicals archive ?
Environmental determinism shaped early work on the tropics.
In spite of this move away from Malthusian forms of environmental determinism, the environmental factors contributing to events of genocide continue to focus on specific factors, not ideas.
From the environmental determinism perspective, we can argue that progress on the maturity path to lean is a function of gradual reduction in the inertial factors in the internal environment.
Oppenheimer wisely avoids the trap of environmental determinism for explaining the rise or fall of a particular civilization.
The images of home are critically important; it is hard to prove environmental determinism, but it is true that different settings cause us as human beings to behave differently.
Okihiro traces racial theory from the environmental determinism espoused by Aristotle to the later belief that heredity determined racial characteristics.
Perhaps Hutchings means to imply that stadial theory wrongly rejected the environmental determinism that the previous chapter had, admittedly, also found tainted.
Environmental determinism in the US became a "scientific" justification for racism.
According to the European ideas of racial and environmental determinism of the eighteenth century, there was a perceived degeneracy of the tropics and its mixed-race people.
Archaeology has successfully moved away from the environmental determinism of the Mesolithic versus the social determinism of the Neolithic models that beset our understandings during the 1980s and 1990s, but this is surely no reason to throw out information on the environmental side.
This environmental determinism, Mann writes, suggests a history of "all fall and no rise"
It is defined on the back of many 'straw men', especially environmental determinism.

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