hypohidrosis

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hypohidrosis

[¦hī·pō‚hī′drō·səs]
(medicine)
Deficient perspiration.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Studies have evaluated environmental stress in extreme settings such as prisons, geographical regions experiencing natural disasters, and times of political instability (Rubanzana, Hedt-Gauthier, Ntaganira, & Freeman, 2015; Tachibana, Kitamura, Shindo, Honma, & Someya, 2014).
A common misconception about environmental stress cracking is that it involves molecular degradation or chemical attack of the plastic material.
Take the time to become acclimated to environmental stress
The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is developing a comprehensive program that addresses how gene expression is altered under different forms of environmental stress and how this alters the risk of developing disease.
The major objectives of genetic transformation of rubber trees at the RRII was the introduction of genes controlling specific agronomic traits--such as the genes for resisting diseases, drought and other environmental stress tolerance, enhanced rubber biosynthesis and timber yield, and tolerance to tapping panel dryness, etc.
PFA-Flex is a series of UHP (ultra-high purity) PFA (perfluoroalkoxy) resins designed specifically for semiconductor processing applications requiring superior environmental stress crack resistance.
This site is dedicated to plant environmental stress in agriculture and biology.
John Pezzuto, who oversees the research at the university's College of Pharmacy, said that resveratrol was a chemical defense agent that the plant produced in response to environmental stress, especially fungal infections.
Susceptibility to pests increases as a system is simplified, and resilience in the face of environmental stress goes down.
BASF Plant Science GmbH (Germany) has patented a transgenic plant transformed by a Transcription Factor Stress-Related Protein (TFSRP) coding nucleic acid, wherein expression of the nucleic acid sequence in the plant results in increased tolerance to environmental stress as compared to a wild type variety of the plant.
It also took into consideration the chronic environmental stress already in place from the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s, the 1991 Gulf War, the unintended effects of the UN sanctions and environmental mismanagement by the former Iraqi regime.
Such a change in sex ratio can indicate that an organism is under environmental stress, says Flaherty, who presented her results last week in Tucson at the annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America.

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