Eocene


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Related to Eocene: Paleocene, Oligocene

Eocene

Geology of, denoting, or formed in the second epoch of the Tertiary period, which lasted for 20 000 000 years, during which hooved mammals appeared

Eocene

[′ē·ə‚sēn]
(geology)
The next to the oldest of the five major epochs of the Tertiary period (in the Cenozoic era).
References in periodicals archive ?
It is known from Middle to Late Eocene paleocoastal deposits in North Carolina (J.
ruguloverruretinus, were discovered from the late Eocene to the
Anthracotheriids are a family of extinct suiform, bunoselenodont artiodactyls that range in age from middle Eocene to Miocene and occurred throughout the Old World as well as in North America.
5 My (referred to in the literature as H-1, Elmo or Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2); Lourens et al.
Carter & McKinney (1992) presented evidence that distribution patterns in Upper Eocene echinoid faunas were related to facies patterns, particularly in relation to sand/mud ratios.
The LSP is the third in a series of staged tests to validate the feasibility of applying the enhanced oil recovery technology of steamflooding to unlock the producing potential of the heavy Eocene oil of the PNZ's carbonate reservoirs.
Combined with other types of data, these analyses show that the Arctic averaged about 13 degrees C (55 degrees F) during the Eocene.
These Upper Eocene (UE), ME and LE depositions are poor source rocks for oil, as in the case of the ME black claystones representing the dark bituminous lithology recorded in that region.
Chelonia is known from Late Cretaceous localities in Europe, the Eocene to the Recent of Australia and North America, and the Miocene of Japan (Ernst et a1.
It is fascinating to find so much superbly preserved palaeontological evidence in Eocene biodiversity.
By 2010, the level will be as high as it was in the Eocene period, only about 15 million years after the dinosaurs.