Ermanaric

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Ermanaric

(ûrmăn`ərĭk), d. c.375, king of the Ostrogoths. He extended his power over other barbarian tribes and thus built up in eastern Europe an empire stretching from the Dneister River north to the Don and east to the headwaters of the Volga. He committed suicide as his empire was being overrun by the Huns. He was a legendary figure in medieval European literature, where his name appears variously as Ermenrichus and Hermeneric; in old Norse literature he was known as Jörmunrekkr.

Ermanaric

 

(also Hermanarle). Died 375. King of the Ostrogoths; member of the Amal family.

Ermanaric was the leader of a vast tribal confederation, headed by the Ostrogoths, that formed in the second half of the fourth century in the region north of the Black Sea. Ermanaric committed suicide in 375 after suffering a defeat by the Huns.

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55) The implication of lines 88-102 is that it is in return for this high-stakes escort service, and not just for his fine singing, that Wiglaf is rewarded so handsomely by both Eormanric and his bride.
From an English perspective, the first effect of the poet's narrative concerning Ealhhild and her marriage to King Eormanric is to raise the status of the Angles by marrying them into the Goths, whose stature they thereby approximate.
In addition (as we are asked to imagine), without Widsith's having acted as escort for the royal princess Ealhhild, her strategic marriage to Eormanric might not have taken place and Northern history might not have been the same.
When the Goths are introduced to the poem at length, chiefly through mention of Eormanric, it is in connection with a marriage that allies that famous king with a princess of Anglian blood in a story that implies her moral advantage.
Best of all were the 600-shilling-worth treasure that Eormanric gave him and the similar treasure that came to him from Ealhhild's hand (90-98).
As the period of Offa and Eormanric, Hrothgar and Hygelac, and Widsith and Beowulf was to the early English, so the early English have seemed to us.
Eormanric, AElfwine), while at times taking supplementary notice of the spellings used by chroniclers writing in Latin (e.