Ostara

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Ostara

Around March 22
Ostara, which coincides with the Vernal Equinox, is one of the four pagan Quarter Days, along with Litha ( Summer Solstice), Mabon ( Autumnal Equinox), and Yule. It is observed by those who follow Wicca (modern witchcraft) and Neopaganism by lighting fires to commemorate the return of light in the spring and to honor the god and goddess.
Also known as Eostre or Alban Eilir, Ostara is also regarded as a time of fertility and conception. In some Wiccan traditions, it is marked as the time when the goddess conceives the god's child, which will be born at the Winter Solstice.
SOURCES:
RelHolCal-2004, p. 271
Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations of the World Dictionary, Fourth Edition. © 2010 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
(the Scandinavian Thor); but together with these some milder deities like the goddess of spring, Eostre, from whom our Easter is named.
Although the Easter Bunny doesn't appear in the Bible, some religious scholars argue it was originally associated with the Virgin Mary, rather than the pagan goddess Eostre.
EOSTRE AWAKENS Date: 12 November - 21 December Time: Monday - Friday 10-4pm (and during evenings when performances showing) Venue: Riverside Theatre, Coleraine Contact: 028 70 123 123 Using steel wire and the written word Elaine Taylor and Gillian McShane explore the ancient themes of Celtic Mythology.
The name Easter is derived from 'Ostara' or 'Eostre', a pagan goddess of fertility, whose feast was celebrated on the Vernal Equinox.
The Venerable Bede, a seventh-century Anglo-Saxon historian, writes that the word Easter comes from the goddess Eostre, an ancient goddess of fertility and the goddess of the dawn who originated in what is now Scandinavia.
It is said Easter got its name after Eostre, a pagan goddess of spring and fertility in ancient times.
EASTER is derived from the word Eostre, the pagan goddess of the season of the sun and rebirth during Ostarum, a pagan spring festival.
Symbolic of new life, eggs have long been culturally important; the word Easter is thought to have originated from the name pagan fertility goddess Eostre.
The naming of the celebration as "Easter" seems to go back to the name of a pre-Christian goddess in England, Eostre, who was celebrated at beginning of spring.
| The word Easter dates back to early England; it is thought to relate to the Pagan goddess of spring and fertility Eostre (also called Ostara).