Ostara

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Ostara

Around March 22
Ostara, which coincides with the Vernal Equinox, is one of the four pagan Quarter Days, along with Litha ( Summer Solstice), Mabon ( Autumnal Equinox), and Yule. It is observed by those who follow Wicca (modern witchcraft) and Neopaganism by lighting fires to commemorate the return of light in the spring and to honor the god and goddess.
Also known as Eostre or Alban Eilir, Ostara is also regarded as a time of fertility and conception. In some Wiccan traditions, it is marked as the time when the goddess conceives the god's child, which will be born at the Winter Solstice.
SOURCES:
RelHolCal-2004, p. 271
References in classic literature ?
the Scandinavian Thor); but together with these some milder deities like the goddess of spring, Eostre, from whom our Easter is named.
But rather than admit that, we hopped on to Google and discovered the Easter Bunny originates from Eostre, the pagan Goddess of Easter, who changed a bird into a hare.
The cotton-tailed rabbit and egg that we all associate with Easter actually harks back to the goddess of dawn Eostre, who is a symbol of the fertility and life, which is celebrated every Spring, and happens to fall around the same time as Easter.
The name Easter was arguably taken from either Eostre, a Teutonic goddess of spring and fertility, or hebdomada alba, which means white week in Latin,A (http://www.
The pagan is here, certainly, and clearly the Catholic, and the book's frequent evocations of Easter, the Christian holiday entirely co-opted from the pagan Eostre, and that season's celebrations of fertility, birth, babies, salvation and love, recombine the two divergent spiritual paths: "Vinegar/into the dye and the rosary--my Easter necklace--// green as the spring needles," Vap writes in "Eggtooth.
Another legend says that the Anglo Saxon goddess Eostre, who gave her name to Eostremonath, or April, and from which Easter derives its name, found a wounded bird and turned it into a hare so it could survive the winter.
According to the 8th-century English church historian, the Venerable Bede, Easter appears to be derived from Eostre (or Eastre), a Saxon mother goddess of fertility and renewal whose feast was celebrated during April as Eostur-monath (month).
The Celts believed their goddess, Eostre, turned into a hare at full moon and the Romans saw the animal as an emblem of fertility, lust, rampant growth and excess.
Grant, Edinburgh THE Easter Bunny - or perhaps more correctly the Easter Hare - was associated with the pagan celebration of the goddess Eostre, from whom the word Easter is derived.
An Anglo-Saxon legend tells how the Saxon goddess Eostre found a wounded bird and transformed it into a hare, so that it could survive the winter.
In pre-Christian Britain, the hare was associated with the spring goddess Eostre, and a connection lives on in the Easter Bunny celebrations.
First century BC: Easter got its name from Eostre, the name of an ancient Pagan goddess who was sometimes represented with the head of a hare.