Ephialtes


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Related to Ephialtes: Ephialtes and Otus

Ephialtes

(ĕf'ēăl`tēz): see AloadaeAloadae
or Aloidae
, in Greek mythology, two giants who warred against the Olympian gods. Their names were Otus and Ephialtes, and they were sons of Aloeus' wife by Poseidon. They tried to reach heaven to overthrow the gods by piling Mt. Ossa on Mt.
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.

Ephialtes

 

Died mid-fifth century B.C Athenian state figure.

Ephialtes expressed the interests of the democratic circles of the Athenian population. He campaigned for a break with Sparta and for an autonomous Athenian foreign policy; in domestic politics he advocated further democratization of the state system and the curtailment of the political power of the Areopagus, which was the bulwark of the aristocracy. In 462, Ephialtes aroused the ire of the aristocracy by carrying out a reform that limited the functions of the Areopagus to authority over criminal cases. Shortly thereafter, he was treacherously assassinated. Pericles was an associate of Ephialtes and carried on his policies.

Ephialtes

giant deprived of his left eye by Apollo and of his right eye by Hercules. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 333]

Ephialtes

Greek betrayer of Spartans at Thermopylae. [Gk. Hist.: Kravitz, 89]
References in periodicals archive ?
He's had great reviews for the role, but ironically he might not have had to undergo such an ordeal - there is no historical evidence that Ephialtes was a hunchback.
he and Ephialtes persuade Assembly members to strip the Areopagus of much of its power.
Finally a Greek named Ephialtes betrayed the defenders of Thermopylae, revealing to the Persians a concealed path around the pass.
Perikles and Ephialtes, tyrannicides: the statues of Riace, art and history.
The fact that it later consisted of fifty-one members suggests that it was reorganized either by Kleisthenes or Ephialtes.
The giants include such biblical and classical figures as Nimrod, Ephialtes, and Antaeus.
Ephialtes he is called, and he made the great endeavors when the giants put the gods in fear.
We suggest that this, combined with the proportionally large percentage of pottery in the deposit from this decade, is possibly due to the democratic reforms of Ephialtes and Pericles (Rotroff & Oakley 1992: 12-13, 51-3).