Ephphatha

Ephphatha

(ĕf`əthə) [Aramaic,=be opened], in the Gospel of St. Mark, words addressed by Jesus to a deaf-mute as Jesus made him hear and speak. As elsewhere in Mark, the Greek text retains and translates the Aramaic words.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ephphatha, which means "to be opened," follows Christopher's transformational journey through the unimaginable obstacles he faced during his young life.
He put his finger into the man's ears and, spitting, touched his tongue; then he looked up to heaven and groaned, and said to him, "Ephphatha!" (that is, "Be opened!") And immediately the man's ears were opened, his speech impediment was removed, and he spoke plainly.
''Ephphatha!' (Be opened!) and immediately the man's ears were opened, his speech impediment was removed, and he spoke plainly.'
He groaned looking up to heaven, as with deep emotion He commanded the man: Ephphatha!-'Be opened!' The Aramaic word, like some sacred formula, was instantaneously effective; the man's ears were opened and his speech difficulty removed.
Celine is a Trustee of the Down Syndrome Association of Nigeria, the Hope4Girls Africa Foundation, and she actively supports the Ephphatha School for Deaf Children in Cameroon.
In 2009, the first Vatican-level conversation about authentic sign language translations occurred at the Pontifical Council for Health Care Workers conference, "Ephphatha! The Deaf Person in the Life of the Church."
Jesus touches him with his fingers and his saliva--just as God bent over the dust of the ground at creation to make a human being--and prays the performative words, "Be opened" (the Aramaic ephphatha cf.
Humbled Jesus travels on to meet a deaf mute man and utters a word that is addressed both to the man and to himself, ephphatha 'Open up'.
"Ephphatha! Be opened!" he says to the man who can neither hear nor speak.
Maxine is a hearing missionary who first started the Ephphatha deaf orphanage for Korean children.
The section on bible studies contains three relatively brief articles: " 'Ephphatha': Opening Channels of Communication (Mark 7:31-37)," "Learning to Tell the Authentic Story of God," and "Listening to the Cries of the People." In the miraculous cure of the deaf man, Jesus symbolically collapses the communication barriers, opening up a lease on life for the hopeless and helpless.
She'd read up on all the tools of the witch's trade, and the girl smiled then uttered the ancient Aramaic magical command to activate the stone: "Ephphatha".