Epicharmus

Epicharmus

(ĕpĭkär`məs), c.550–c.460 B.C., Sicilian Greek comic dramatist. He was the first to write a coherent artistic comedy, and he dealt with forms other than personal satire such as mythological burlesque.

Bibliography

See A. W. Pickard-Cambridge, Dithyramb, Tragedy, and Comedy (1927, repr. 1962).

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References in classic literature ?
The claim to Comedy is put forward by the Megarians,--not only by those of Greece proper, who allege that it originated under their democracy, but also by the Megarians of Sicily, for the poet Epicharmus, who is much earlier than Chionides and Magnes, belonged to that country.
These thinkers, including Hippasus, Epicharmus, Empedocles, and Philolaus, had democratic leanings both in the organization of their society and in their attitude toward access to knowledge, which is what led them to publish Pythagorean secrets.
A quotation of the Greek philosopher Epicharmus restates this philosophy in atomistic terms: "Les elements se sont assembles, puis us se sont desassembles et sont retournes la d'ou us etaient venus: la terre dans la terre, l'ame en haut.
10, are all taken to be associated with mime, specifically with Theocritus Idyll 15 and Herodas Mimiamb 4, and with what Kirichenko terms a "comedy" by Epicharmus about visitors to Delphi, which he claims to be another subgenre of mime.
Ancient Greek playwright Epicharmus wrote a comedy called The Sausage..
Orpheus is there, Hesiod, tragedies, Choerilus, Homer, Epicharmus, every sort of literature.
In antiquity, the problem of persistence through time is usually associated with certain puzzles or paradoxes, such as the Ship of Theseus (2) and Epicharmus' Growing Argument, (3) which call into question the assumption that an enduring entity can gain and shed properties while still remaining numerically the same.
Faced with the authority of Horace, a Plautine like Lipsius could only shrug, signing off on a letter championing Plautus, "There remains the judgment of Horace, which, I pray, may be passed over for the sake of Horace." (66) Horace does castigate Plautus several times, but he refers directly to Terence only once: "Plautus hurries along like his model, Epicharmus of Sicily.
MacDonald, Character-Portraiture in Epicharmus, Sophron, and Plato (University of the South, 1931), pp.
We move from the epigram to four writers for the comic stage: Pherecrates and Alexis and, possibly, Epicharmus and Aristophanes, all of the fifth and fourth centuries BC.