epicondyle

(redirected from Epicondylar)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

epicondyle

[¦ep·ə′kän‚dīl]
(anatomy)
An eminence on the condyle of a bone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
When the AIN, the epicondylar axis, the center of the femoral trochlear groove, and the trochlear point were identified and error was thought to be present, two other researchers participated in these steps to reduce the measurement error.
To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of a case series with chronic lateral epicondylar nonunion or malunion.
In addition, these projections reduce condylar and epicondylar overlap, which can be beneficial in demonstrating patellar fractures or other subtle types of acute injury or degenerative pathology not adequately demonstrated by other projections.
A set of five anthropometric measurements was taken on each femur: maximum length, maximum diameter of the head, midshaft circumference, maximum anteroposterior diameter of the femoral shaft, and epicondylar width.
The four quantitative measurements were taken: the mastoid length, femoral head diameter, humeral epicondylar breadth and glenoid fossa length.
It is based on the location and pattern of the fracture and considers all fractures within the trans epicondylar width of the knee.
In the FDB data, using forensic height and weight to calculate BMI, the humerus and femur head diameters, femur epicondylar and tibia proximal breadths do not have significant correlations with BMI.
The ulnar nerve may be compressed at five anatomical sites proximally to distally: at the arcade of Struthers, the medial intermuscular septum, epicondylar groove, Osborne's ligament (the roof of the actual boundary of the cubital tunnel), and flexor-pronator aponeurosis; the epicondylar groove and Osborne's ligament are the most frequent areas.[2],[25] The effective surgical treatment for nerve entrapment is timely decompression, involving several controversial approaches typically involving one of the following: in situ decompression (open or endoscopic), medial epicondylectomy, or anterior transposition (subcutaneous, submuscular, or intramuscular).[7],[8],[9],[10],[11],[12],[13] None of these are considered superior to the others.
The femur and tibia were fixed to the testing apparatus using cemented intramedullary rods and screws; the tibia was positioned vertically, and the femur was positioned such that the epicondylar axis was horizontal.
In the neutral position, the femoral component was aligned such that the distal bone resection was perpendicular to the mechanical axis of the femur, and the anterior and posterior resections were parallel to the clinical epicondylar axis in the transverse plane.