Epictetus


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Epictetus

(ĕpĭktē`təs), c.A.D. 50–c.A.D. 138, Phrygian Stoic philosopher. He wrote nothing, but his teachings were set down by his disciple Arrian in the Discourses and the Encheiridion. Epictetus emphasized indifference to external goods and taught that the true good is within oneself. His Stoicism was outstanding in its insistence on the doctrine of the brotherhood of man.

Bibliography

See study by I. Xenakis (1969).

Epictetus

 

Born circa A.D. 50; died circa 138. Greek Stoic philosopher.

Epictetus was the slave of one of Nero’s favorites and later was given his freedom. He attended lectures by the Stoic Musonius Rufus. After Domitian expelled the philosophers from Rome in A.D. 89, Epictetus settled in Nicopolis (Epirus); there, following the example of Socrates, he taught Stoic morality in conversations and street arguments. Like Socrates, Epictetus wrote nothing. He lived in extreme poverty. His philosophical teachings were preserved in the notes of his student Flavius Arrianus.

Epictetus’ doctrine centered on the elaboration and preservation of a certain moral position—namely, that under any condition of wealth or poverty and whether in power or in slavery, men must preserve spiritual freedom and internal independence from such conditions. In order to achieve this, man must divide all things and affairs into those that depend on him and those that do not; with fortitude and despite everything, he must do his duty with respect to the former, and he must ignore the latter. Both Epictetus’ ascetic morality and the external form of his “diatribes” (the strained awkwardness of intonation and the arguments with an imaginary opponent) are in many ways similar to Christian sermons.

WORKS

Epictète: Entretiens, vols. 1–4. Compiled and translated by J. Souihé and A. Jagu. Paris, 1949–65.
In Russian translation:
“Besedy Epikteta.” Vestnik drevnei istorii, 1975, nos. 2–4; 1976, no. 2.

REFERENCES

Shtaerman, E. M. “Epiktet i ego mesto v rimskom stoitsizme.” Vestnik drevnei istorii, 1975, no. 2.
Bonhöffer, A. Epiktet und das Neue Testament. Giessen, 1911.

S. S. AVERINTSEV

Epictetus

?50--?120 ad, Greek Stoic philosopher, who stressed self-renunciation and the brotherhood of man
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps this passage from Epictetus came to his mind: "Remember that you are an actor in a drama, of such a kind as the author pleases to make it.
In suggesting the use of "given back" as a metaphor for death, Epictetus brings to light several points regarding the nature of our conception of death and dying, which neither he, nor other investigators of death, seem to have taken any further: he recognizes the role of metaphor in providing a foundation for our understanding of the "unknown"; he recognizes these metaphors as culturally constructed, and culturally reinforced; finally, and perhaps most importantly, he realizes that these metaphors, since they are our own creations, may be replaced when they no longer offer us the increased understanding, or at least reduced perplexity, which they are intended to provide.
The conjecture recalls the debates a century ago on whether Epictetus and New Testament writers were mutually indebted, an argument which evoked a notable monograph from A.
An article published in January 2017 made reference to an academic research published last year by University of the Philippines professor emeritus Epictetus Patalinghug indicating that the telcos are earning below the average rate of returns compared to the top Philippine firms in other industries over a longer time horizon.
Using the freed Roman slave Epictetus as his philosophical guide--much as Dante used Virgil as his conductor through Paradise, Purgatory, and Inferno--Pigliucci begins with the Stoic "dichotomy of control.
The Greek Stoic philosopher Epictetus once said, "We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.
An academic research paper by University of the Philippines (UP) Professor Emeritus Epictetus Patalinghug showed that over a longer time horizon, PLDT and Globe Telecom, as well as property companies, such as SM Prime and Ayala Land, are earning below the average rate of returns attained by top Philippine firms in other industries.
In a paper by University of the Philippines professor emeritus Epictetus Patalinghug, a comparative outlook at profitability indicators since 1997 showed that retail, and food and beverage companies have averaged higher rates of return than some of the top telecom and real estate companies in the Philippines.
Mind you, I always thought Epictetus was a funny name for a bloke from Gateshead.
An academic research paper by University of the Philippines (UP) Professor Emeritus Epictetus Patalinghug, PhD, shows that over a longer time horizon, PLDT and Globe Telecom, as well as real-estate companies, such as SM Prime and Ayala Land, are earning below the average rate of returns attained by top Philippine firms in other industries.
To those philosophers who in their writings deny a hell," he continued, "I will say: 'Gentlemen, we do not pass our days with Cicero, Atticus, Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus.
Epictetus, Enchiridion, Dover Publications, New York, 2004, ISBN-13: 978-0486433592.