epicureanism

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epicureanism

(ĕp'ĭkyo͝orē`ənĭz'əm), philosophy that follows the teachings of EpicurusEpicurus
, 341–270 B.C., Greek philosopher, b. Samos; son of an Athenian colonist. He claimed to be self-taught, although tradition states that he was schooled in the systems of Plato and Democritus by his father and various philosophers.
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, who held that pleasure is the end of all morality and that real pleasure is attained through a life of prudence, honor, and justice. The philosophy was popular throughout the ancient world; it was spread by the successors of Epicurus, who included Polystratus, Zeno of Sidon, and Philodemus of Gadara. Only in later times did epicureanism come to mean devotion to extravagant pleasure.

Epicureanism

 

the philosophical teaching derived from the ideas of Epicurus.

The philosophical school (called the Garden) that Epicurus founded in Athens was one of the most influential intellectual currents of the Hellenic age along with Stoicism, its constant opponent in philosophical debate. The most famous members of the early Garden (fourth and third centuries B.C.) were Metrodorus, Polyaenus, Hermarchus, and Colotes; those of the middle period (second and first centuries B.C.) were Zeno of Sidon, Phaedrus, and Philodemus of Gadara. Phaedrus (who taught Cicero) and Philodemus (who may have been Lucretius’ teacher) brought Epicureanism to Rome. The outstanding achievement of Roman Epicureanism is Lucretius’ narrative poem On the Nature of Things (first century B.C.). The Epicurean school remained in existence until the middle of the fourth century.

A revival of Epicureanism (especially its ethics and its atomistic teachings) occurred during the Renaissance; its ideas continued to spread during the 17th and 18th centuries and were most consistently developed by P. Gassendi. Epicureanism was also frequently understood in the vulgar sense—that is, as the cult of sensory pleasures (for example, in ancient Rome, among the philosophers of the Renaissance, and during the Enlightenment in France).

REFERENCES

See references under .

A. L. DOBROKHOTOV

Epicureanism

See also Feast.
Belshazzar
gave banquet unrivalled for sumptuousness. [O.T.: Daniel 5:1–4]
Finches of the Grove
eating club established for expensive dining. [Br. Lit.: Great Expectations]
Gatsby, Jay
modern Trimalchio, wines and dines the upper echelon. [Am. Lit.: The Great Gatsby]
Lucullus, Lucius Licinius
(110–57 B.C.) gave luxurious banquets. [Rom. Hist.: New Century, 650]
Marius
young pagan who follows the original philosophical tenets of Epicurus in his search for an answer to life. [Br. Lit.: Pater Marius the Epicurean in Magill II, 630]
Trimalchio
vulgar freedman gives lavish feast for noble guests. [Rom. Lit.: Satyricon]
References in periodicals archive ?
To those of us in the Epicurean tradition, the answer to most ethical questions lies in the hedonic calculus, by which issues boil down to figuring out how to maximize pleasure and how to minimize pain for the long term.
Does modern thinking and even much of modern science assume an Epicurean cosmology and metaphysics?
Corbett continues to add depth to his analysis by addressing the significance of the vertical axis between the tenth cantos of each canticle, which for Corbett reflect the eschatologically divergent beliefs between the Epicurean and of the believer.
Even if one manages to escape detection, Epicureans believe that those who commit injustice nevertheless increase their anxiety, since they would constantly be wracked by fear of eventual detection and reprisal from those they disadvantage (KD 35; VS 7; DRN 5: 1151-1160; DF 1: 50-51).
In this carefully researched study, Gill gives us a detailed account of Stoic and Epicurean thinking on the human personality, the human self.
Its author tosses together Platonic, Epicurean and Cynic arguments against the fear of death, apparently with no regard for their consistency.
They are young and mobile, and some follow a seasonal trade, serving epicureans in Maine in the summer and back to Sarasota in the winter.
The Epicureans and the Stoics were Paul's interlocutors in Athens, and, to the delight of every academician since, Paul took them seriously.
To Stoics and Epicureans, peace of soul no doubt took precedence over the exacting search for truth, and to gain such peace the discipie generally swallowed whole the words of the revered master.
79) The earthly female body as a "material" reduction of an allegorical personification is also strikingly evoked in a dismissal of Lucretius by an early Christian writer of considerable authority, and a major source of information about the Epicureans.
First the facts: Rice is eliminating 12 of its 20 units to carry out its business strategy of focusing on its eight Rice Epicurean upscale stores and building its new catering business.
The heart of the book, therefore, is Bryant's analysis of the way the Sophists, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics and Epicureans on the one hand were influenced by and/or reacted to the norms and values of their times, and on the other hand themselves influenced and altered the ethical ideas and behavior of the Greeks of their own day and later.